Latest News from NPR

on:

NCPR is supported by:

 
Hourly Newscast
4 min., 45 sec.

Programs

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Latest Features:
Getty Images
July 24, 2014 | NPR · Seven years after the subprime mortgage crisis, the U.S. economy has not yet fully recovered. Now two economists have come up with new evidence about what's holding the economy back.
 
July 24, 2014 | NPR · Military war dogs serve combat tours, save lives and suffer injuries like the soldiers they serve. On Capitol Hill this week, dogs and their handlers made the case that all dogs should be brought home from war and treated with the respect they've earned.
 
Getty
July 24, 2014 | NPR · Dozens of children have filed complaints saying they were subjected to inhumane treatment at Border Patrol stations. The complaints center on the holding cells, referred to as "freezers" by migrants.
 

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Latest Features:
July 23, 2014 | NPR · The remains of passengers of the downed Malaysia Airlines flight arrived in the Netherlands, on what has been a national day of mourning. Most of those killed in the jet that was brought down over Ukraine were Dutch. Robert Siegel talks with Thomas Erdbrink of The New York Times, who is in the Netherlands.
 
AFP/Getty Images
July 23, 2014 | NPR · Even before the double calamity of its two downed flights, Malaysia Airlines was trying to adapt to momentous shifts in Asia's aviation industry. Now, it faces either bankruptcy or privatization.
 
July 23, 2014 | NPR · An uncontacted Amazonian tribe has ended its isolation in Brazil. Fiona Watson, the field and research director for Survival International, explains why this tribal people left its village.
 

Latest Saturday rundown




WE Saturday Feature

July 19, 2014 | NPR · NPR's Scott Simon talks with David Herzsenhorn of The New York Times about the latest developments in Ukraine, where a Malaysia Airlines passenger plane was downed on Thursday, killing 298 people.
 

Latest Sunday rundown


WE Sunday Feature

July 20, 2014 | NPR · NPR's Arun Rath gets the latest from correspondent Corey Flintoff at the site of last week's downing of a Malaysian jetliner in Eastern Ukraine.
 

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Design and construction

May 25, 2013 — The gleaming stainless steel arch in St. Louis is, officially, a monument to westward expansion. But in The Gateway Arch: A Biography, Tracy Campbell argues that the monument's meaning is more complicated. He tells NPR about the controversies, the clout and the costs behind the 630-foot structure.
Launch in player | Comments |
Nov 7, 2011 — Crime might not pay, but it does deliver in the world of fiction. Author Tony D'Souza recommends three of his favorite books about illicit activities. They'll have you contemplating a life of misdeeds and malfeasance.
Launch in player | Comments |
Jul 15, 2011 — NPR coverage of Colossus: Hoover Dam and the Making of the American Century by Michael Hiltzik. News, author interviews, critics' picks and more.
Comments |
Jun 30, 2011 — Master storytellers Anthony Doerr and Frederick Reiken explore interrelated lives, while Carlos Eire describes being airlifted out of Cuba. Rick Springfield recalls his life as a pop star, Michael Scott Moore looks at worldwide surfing culture, and Michael Hiltzik recounts the building of Hoover Dam.
Comments |
May 15, 2011 — Lots of guys buy a midlife crisis sports car, but not British author Robert Penn. He set out to build the ultimate bike, one that he could ride every day and grow old with. His search cost him thousands of dollars and took him all over Europe and across the Atlantic.
Launch in player | Comments |
Oct 5, 2010 — It's a seductive week in paperback, with love stories from Nobel Prize-winner Orhan Pamuk and Pulitzer Prize-winner Phillip Roth, and an intimate glimpse into Louis Armstrong's life from Wall Street Journal drama critic Terry Teachout.
Comments |
Jun 8, 2010 — When the Hoover Dam was finished in 1935, it was three times larger than any other dam on the planet. Journalist Michael Hiltzik examines the humongous engineering achievement — including how the Hoover Dam was conceived, designed and built — in a new book, Colossus.
Launch in player | Comments |
Sep 26, 2009 — Most people think of the Cold War as a long, glacial period, but in the beginning it was dangerously unstable. Neil Sheehan, author of A Bright Shining Lie, says there might well have been nuclear war — had it not been for one man: the subject of his latest book, A Fiery Peace in a Cold War: Bernard Schriever and the Ultimate Weapon.
Launch in player | Comments |
more Design and construction from NPR