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September 2, 2014 | NPR · At a Labor Day picnic in Milwaukee, the president accused the GOP of blocking economic initiatives. He urged the sympathetic union audience to turn their frustration into political action in November.
 
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September 2, 2014 | NPR · The city's plan to restructure its debt has been praised as a creative way to protect both pensioners and its art museum. But some creditors — and residents — feel like they're being railroaded.
 
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September 2, 2014 | NPR · A company called WTAS is reviving the defunct accounting firm's name and hoping clients have forgotten its associations with the Enron scandal.
 

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September 1, 2014 | NPR · Ebola has exposed weaknesses in Africa's health networks and a failure to work together to arrest the spread of the virus. The "not our problem" response is taking an economic toll on the continent.
 
September 1, 2014 | NPR · Nearly 260 health workers in West Africa have been infected, and 134 have died. Dr. Robert Garry of Tulane University, who worked with five who died, discusses the devastation in the community.
 
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September 1, 2014 | NPR · Ads with candidates shooting guns are proliferating this year. It can all be traced back to Sen. Joe Manchin's famed 2010 spot "Dead Aim."
 

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August 30, 2014 | NPR · Ukrainian forces are defending the port city of Novoazovsk from what they say is a Russian invasion. Scott Simon talks to correspondent Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson.
 

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August 31, 2014 | NPR · Immigration remains one of the most challenging issues for President Obama. Political correspondent Mara Liasson discusses the political cost of the choices before him with Linda Wertheimer.
 

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Design and construction

May 25, 2013 — The gleaming stainless steel arch in St. Louis is, officially, a monument to westward expansion. But in The Gateway Arch: A Biography, Tracy Campbell argues that the monument's meaning is more complicated. He tells NPR about the controversies, the clout and the costs behind the 630-foot structure.
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Nov 7, 2011 — Crime might not pay, but it does deliver in the world of fiction. Author Tony D'Souza recommends three of his favorite books about illicit activities. They'll have you contemplating a life of misdeeds and malfeasance.
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Jul 15, 2011 — NPR coverage of Colossus: Hoover Dam and the Making of the American Century by Michael Hiltzik. News, author interviews, critics' picks and more.
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Jun 30, 2011 — Master storytellers Anthony Doerr and Frederick Reiken explore interrelated lives, while Carlos Eire describes being airlifted out of Cuba. Rick Springfield recalls his life as a pop star, Michael Scott Moore looks at worldwide surfing culture, and Michael Hiltzik recounts the building of Hoover Dam.
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May 15, 2011 — Lots of guys buy a midlife crisis sports car, but not British author Robert Penn. He set out to build the ultimate bike, one that he could ride every day and grow old with. His search cost him thousands of dollars and took him all over Europe and across the Atlantic.
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Oct 5, 2010 — It's a seductive week in paperback, with love stories from Nobel Prize-winner Orhan Pamuk and Pulitzer Prize-winner Phillip Roth, and an intimate glimpse into Louis Armstrong's life from Wall Street Journal drama critic Terry Teachout.
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Jun 8, 2010 — When the Hoover Dam was finished in 1935, it was three times larger than any other dam on the planet. Journalist Michael Hiltzik examines the humongous engineering achievement — including how the Hoover Dam was conceived, designed and built — in a new book, Colossus.
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Sep 26, 2009 — Most people think of the Cold War as a long, glacial period, but in the beginning it was dangerously unstable. Neil Sheehan, author of A Bright Shining Lie, says there might well have been nuclear war — had it not been for one man: the subject of his latest book, A Fiery Peace in a Cold War: Bernard Schriever and the Ultimate Weapon.
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