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September 2, 2014 | NPR · At a Labor Day picnic in Milwaukee, the president accused the GOP of blocking economic initiatives. He urged the sympathetic union audience to turn their frustration into political action in November.
 
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September 2, 2014 | NPR · The city's plan to restructure its debt has been praised as a creative way to protect both pensioners and its art museum. But some creditors — and residents — feel like they're being railroaded.
 
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September 2, 2014 | NPR · A company called WTAS is reviving the defunct accounting firm's name and hoping clients have forgotten its associations with the Enron scandal.
 

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September 1, 2014 | NPR · Ebola has exposed weaknesses in Africa's health networks and a failure to work together to arrest the spread of the virus. The "not our problem" response is taking an economic toll on the continent.
 
September 1, 2014 | NPR · Nearly 260 health workers in West Africa have been infected, and 134 have died. Dr. Robert Garry of Tulane University, who worked with five who died, discusses the devastation in the community.
 
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September 1, 2014 | NPR · Ads with candidates shooting guns are proliferating this year. It can all be traced back to Sen. Joe Manchin's famed 2010 spot "Dead Aim."
 

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August 30, 2014 | NPR · Ukrainian forces are defending the port city of Novoazovsk from what they say is a Russian invasion. Scott Simon talks to correspondent Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson.
 

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August 31, 2014 | NPR · Immigration remains one of the most challenging issues for President Obama. Political correspondent Mara Liasson discusses the political cost of the choices before him with Linda Wertheimer.
 

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Intellectuals

Nov 18, 2012 — Athanasius Kircher, a 17th-century Jesuit priest, was a renaissance man in name and deed. He strove to learn about almost everything. Unfortunately, many of his inventions and theories were pure nonsense. John Glassie writes about Kircher in his new book, A Man of Misconceptions.
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May 24, 2012 — In The Greater Journey, American intellectuals travel to Paris during a cultural boom.
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May 17, 2012 — Novelist Tayari Jones explores a father's deception of his family, while historian David McCullough looks at 19th-century Americans in Paris, Roy Blount Jr. revels in verbal curiosities, writer Bill James reflects on true-crime stories, and journalist Diana Henriques probes the Ponzi scheme of Bernie Madoff.
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Aug 12, 2011 — Have you had a chance to poke around the new NPR Books yet? We've given it a heck of an overhaul. Here's the how, what and why — and an invitation to explore.
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Jul 14, 2011 — NPR coverage of The Greater Journey: Americans in Paris by David McCullough. News, author interviews, critics' picks and more.
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Jul 2, 2011 — Samuel Morse, best known as the inventor of the telegraph, was also an accomplished painter. His masterpiece, Gallery of the Louvre, was a composite painting of Italian Renaissance works he created as a way to bring the culture of Europe home to America.
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Jun 2, 2011 — When book critic Maureen Corrigan was a kid, her family would pile into the car for trips to sites of historical interest. For Corrigan, summer has always been the season for traveling back to a bygone age — either by hitting the road or hitting the books.
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Jun 2, 2011 — Sue Miller and Alexander McCall Smith deliver vivid character studies in their latest novels, while Christopher Hitchens reflects on his personal and political evolution, Rick Reilly jumps into some sports from hell, and Paul Greenberg takes a hard look at fish farming.
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Jun 19, 2010 — Just what is a summer book, anyway? Does it have to be a big, fat, juicy page turner to earn the right to be packed away in the luggage (or downloaded on the e-reader)? We put that question to several book reviewers to find out what they like to take along on summer getaways.
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Jun 8, 2010 — In Hitch-22, controversial writer Christopher Hitchens has authored three memoirs in one: literary, political and personal. Hitchens' political writing radiates anger and toughness, but his stories of his loved ones are remarkably sensitive and emotionally real.
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