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April 18, 2014 | NPR · The agreement calls on all parties to refrain from violence, requires that illegally-armed groups disarm and that control of government buildings be returned to Ukrainian authorities.
 
April 18, 2014 | NPR · President Obama said enrollment under the Affordable Care Act reached 8 million after the deadline was extended by 2 weeks. The figure represents a turnaround from the disastrous debut of the website.
 
April 18, 2014 | NPR · Morning Edition spent a lot of time recently reporting from the U.S.-Mexico border. President Obama has deported 2 million people from the U.S. But many say that number is misleading.
 

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April 20, 2014 | NPR · California farmers produce an enormous proportion of American produce, but the state is now experiencing a record-breaking drought that is being felt throughout the state and the U.S.
 
April 20, 2014 | NPR · It's been a grim Easter Sunday in South Korea as the death toll continues to rise from the ferry disaster that left nearly 300 passengers, many of them high school students, dead or missing.
 
Courtesy of Jessica Kensky and Patrick Downes
April 20, 2014 | WBUR · Newlyweds Jessica Kensky and Patrick Downes each lost a leg in the Boston Marathon bombing. Rescue the assistance dog helps fetch keys and push buttons, bringing warmth and joy as the couple recovers.
 

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April 19, 2014 | NPR · The search continues for hundreds of people, mostly students, who were on board a South Korean ferry when it sank this week. Correspondent Anthony Kuhn shares the latest with NPR's Wade Goodwyn.
 

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April 20, 2014 | NPR · Monday is the 2014 Boston Marathon. Security will be tight, and this year's race will be an emotional event that will be about more than who wins.
 

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Western stories

Feb 14, 2014The Son, by Phillipp Meyer, tells the epic tale of the McCullough family. It appears at No. 12.
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Jan 28, 2014 — In softcover nonfiction, the four-star general describes a culture gap between the military and civilian worlds, and Bridges explains how The Dude - of The Big Lebowski - is a kind of Zen master. In fiction, James Salter chronicles betrayal, Taiye Selasi looks at a grieving Ghanaian family and Philipp Meyer delivers a multigenerational family saga.
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Jul 9, 2013 — Have you ever found yourself in the library or a bookstore, about to go on vacation, with no idea what books to bring? NPR's Lynn Neary talks to three book critics about the best reads of the summer.
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Jun 7, 2013 — Philipp Meyer's The Son, a sprawling epic about a Texas family, debuts at No. 6.
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May 28, 2013 — Philipp Meyer (American Rust) has crafted a multigenerational epic that captures the Lone Star State's contradictions and vast sweep. Critic Michael Schaub calls The Son "one of the most solid, unsparing pieces of American historical fiction to come out this century."
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May 28, 2013 — Philipp Meyer's second novel is a centuries-spanning family saga that chronicles the growth of Texas. Many hands are bloodied in the novel's conflicts: between settlers and Native Americans, between Texan ranchers and Mexicans, and finally, between ranchers and the oil men who take over the land.
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May 14, 2013 — Benjamin Percy's new literary werewolf novel, Red Moon, is packed with vivid, gory-lush description and heavy allegory about a world where "lycans" are a persecuted minority. But reviewer Nick Mancusi says the book gives short shrift to character development.
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Mar 15, 2012 — A racially charged murder mystery set in Kansas, Mary Doria Russell's Doc debuts at No. 13.
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Mar 8, 2012The Sisters Brothers — holding the No. 11 spot — spins a darkly comic yarn set during the Gold Rush.
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Mar 7, 2012 — Novelist T.C. Boyle takes on a California environmental battle while Mary Doria Russell takes a fresh look at the Wild West of Doc Holliday and Wyatt Earp. In nonfiction, Sarah Vowell tours Hawaii, Charles Fishman looks at the future of water, Allen Shawn reflects on being a twin, and Ben Ryder Howe on running a Brooklyn deli.
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