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April 17, 2014 | NPR · Scientists and food activists are launching a campaign to promote seeds that can be freely shared, rather than protected through patents and licenses. They call it the Open Source Seed Initiative.
 
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April 17, 2014 | NPR · A typical UPS truck now has hundreds of sensors on it. That's changing the way UPS drivers work — and it foreshadows changes coming for workers throughout the economy.
 
April 17, 2014 | NPR · Brazil is the spiritual home of soccer and a world powerhouse in the sport. It's woven into the Brazilian psyche. Wins and losses have had repercussions in other realms — including politics.
 

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April 16, 2014 | NPR · Ukrainian tanks arrived in the city of Kramatorsk Wednesday morning. By the time they rolled out of the city, they were flying Russian flags. People in Kramatorsk tell the story of what happened.
 
April 16, 2014 | NPR · NATO has announced a strengthening of its forces near the alliance's eastern border. Gen. George Joulwan, the former NATO supreme allied commander for Europe, discusses the plan.
 
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April 16, 2014 | NPR · A 325 million-year-old fossil find shows that the gill structures of modern sharks are actually quite different from their ancient ancestors.
 

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April 12, 2014 | NPR · As pro-Russia demonstrators continue their tense standoff in Eastern Ukraine, police are conspicuously absent from city streets.
 

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April 13, 2014 | NPR · As the anniversary of last year's marathon bombing approaches, NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with correspondent Carrie Johnson about the investigation and legal wrangling yet to come.
 

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African American families

Dec 4, 2013 — NPR staff and critics selected more than 200 standout titles. Now it's up to you: Choose your own adventure! Use our tags to search through books and find the perfect read for yourself or someone else.
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Oct 7, 2013 — In softcover fiction, Will Self spelunks the depths of consciousness in a mental hospital; Amity Gaige divulges an East German immigrant's secrets; Cristina Garcia defines the space that separates a dictator from an exile; and Ayana Mathis follows the life of a mother during the Great Migration.
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Jun 6, 2013 — For readers in search of tales that step outside familiar viewpoints, these authors unravel conflict, religion, race and love — from new and different angles. In these novels, a child from the slums, an executed zealot, a reluctant immigrant, a guilty survivor and a suffering mother take center stage.
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Dec 21, 2012 — Ayana Mathis' Twelve Tribes Of Hattie is a tale of adversity and resilience. It debuts at No. 10.
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Dec 11, 2012 — Oprah Winfrey's second pick for her rebooted book club is The Twelve Tribes of Hattie, by first-time novelist Ayana Mathis. It's a chronicle of the Great Migration of African-Americans leaving the rural South, following a family matriarch who leaves Georgia to start a new life in Philadelphia.
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Jul 16, 2012 — In Help Me to Find My People, Heather Andrea Williams uses artifacts from the post-Civil War era to explore the emotional toll of separation on families during slavery, and of their arduous journeys to reconnect.
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May 17, 2012 — Novelist Tayari Jones explores a father's deception of his family, while historian David McCullough looks at 19th-century Americans in Paris, Roy Blount Jr. revels in verbal curiosities, writer Bill James reflects on true-crime stories, and journalist Diana Henriques probes the Ponzi scheme of Bernie Madoff.
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Jan 7, 2012 — In Salvage the Bones, a hurricane threatens a coastal Mississippi town. It debuts at No. 15.
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Nov 17, 2011 — In a celebratory National Book Awards on Wall Street last night, Stephen Greenblatt took the nonfiction award for Swerve, while, in a surprise turn in fiction, Jesmyn Ward won for Salvage the Bones.
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Nov 16, 2011 — On Tuesday evening in New York City, the finalists for the National Book Award gathered on the eve of the ceremony to share their work. Listen to the nominated authors read from five sober and splendid works of fiction.
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