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August 27, 2014 | NPR · The report said it couldn't be proven that anyone had died because of wait times at the medical center in Phoenix. On Tuesday, President Obama pledged to do better by vets and announced initiatives.
 
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August 27, 2014 | SCPR · The Los Angeles Unified School District has shut down a half-a-billion-dollar deal with Apple and Pearson to provide classroom technology. Here's what happened.
 
August 27, 2014 | NPR · Schools in Napa Valley are to reopen Wednesday after the area's worst earthquake in decades. Hundreds of buildings and homes were damaged and a lot of rebuilding work remains to be done.
 

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August 26, 2014 | NPR · Dr. Tom Frieden, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, has arrived in West Africa to assess the Ebola outbreak. The situation in Liberia, he says, is "absolutely unprecedented."
 
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August 26, 2014 | NPR · An inquiry in the U.K. has found that more than 1,400 children have been sexually abused by an organized ring of men in the northern English town of Rotherham.
 
August 26, 2014 | NPR · Robert Siegel speaks with Stephen R. Kelly, a visiting professor at Duke University, about how North and South Carolina hope to resolve questions about the border between them. The original border, which was mandated by the British during the colonial era, was never surveyed properly. That's caused headaches ever since the 18th century.
 

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August 23, 2014 | NPR · Nearly 1,500 people have died in the Ebola outbreak, and more nations in the region are closing their borders. NPR's Scott Simon speaks to Africa correspondent Ofeibea Quist-Arcton about the epidemic.
 

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August 24, 2014 | NPR · In the wake of violent clashes between protesters and police in Ferguson, Mo., President Obama is ordering a review of the federal programs that help local police departments purchase military gear.
 

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Atlanta (Ga.)

Jul 30, 2012 — Growing up near Atlanta, Karin Slaughter learned that tragic crimes can happen to anyone — even children. She says she sets her crime fiction in Atlanta as a way to honor the city's people and turning points, from the election of its first black mayor to the 1996 Olympics.
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May 17, 2012 — Novelist Tayari Jones explores a father's deception of his family, while historian David McCullough looks at 19th-century Americans in Paris, Roy Blount Jr. revels in verbal curiosities, writer Bill James reflects on true-crime stories, and journalist Diana Henriques probes the Ponzi scheme of Bernie Madoff.
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Jul 17, 2011 — NPR coverage of Them: A Novel by Nathan McCall. News, author interviews, critics' picks and more.
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Jul 15, 2011 — NPR coverage of The Law of the White Circle by Thornwell Jacobs, W. Fitzhugh Brundage, Paul Stephen Hudson, and Walter White. News, author interviews, critics' picks and more.
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Jun 25, 2011 — NPR's Lynn Neary taps three book critics — Laura Miller, Ron Charles and Rigoberto Gonzalez — to get their picks for the best summer reading.
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May 19, 2011 — In Tayari Jones' novel Silver Sparrow, two young girls grow up as secret sisters. They are daughters of the same man, but have different mothers. And just one of them knows that the other exists.
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Oct 6, 2008 — In an effort to reconnect with his Jewish faith, Georgia-native Benyamin Cohen explored the Christianity across the "Bible Belt" of America. He documented his experiences in My Jesus Year: A Rabbi's Son Wanders the Bible Belt in Search of His Own Faith.
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Jan 29, 2008 — "Gentrification" is one of those words that sets some people's teeth on edge. Does it mean improving a neighborhood or displacing longtime residents? Journalist and professor Nathan McCall takes on the topic in novel form and with a novel twist in Them.
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May 11, 2007 — When Eva Rutland saw her four children go off to school in 1950s Sacramento, it was in a new era of integration. Her memoir of that time, When We Were Colored, is now being republished by her daughter.
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Sep 22, 2006 — On Sept. 22, 1906, thousands of whites in Atlanta joined together downtown and began attacking and killing the city's blacks. Dozens were murdered in violence that continued for four days. But the riot hasn't been commemorated or taught in schools — until now.
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