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July 30, 2014 | KQED · Adding a translation to the English label would require bigger bottles, pharmacists say. They worry patients would wind up carrying a few pills around loose — without any instructions at all.
 
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July 30, 2014 | WNYC · In the past 20 years, New Jersey went from having more than 20 percent of U.S. pharmaceutical manufacturing jobs to less than 10 percent. That means offices, labs and warehouses have gone dark.
 
July 30, 2014 | NPR · Sheik Humarr Khan, one of the doctors fighting to control West Africa's largest Ebola outbreak, died Tuesday in Sierra Leone. He was 39.
 

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July 30, 2014 | NPR · An explosion rocked a crowded Gaza market during what was expected to be a lull in the fighting. Earlier in the day a United Nations school was hit by what U.N. officials say was Israeli artillery fire, killing at least 15 people. Meanwhile, rocket fire from Gaza continues to be fired into Israel.
 
July 30, 2014 | NPR · Federal Reserve policymakers are announcing that the Fed plans to leave short-term interest rates at a level near zero. This, despite an economy that grew at a surprisingly strong 4 percent annual rate in the most recent quarter.
 
July 30, 2014 | NPR · Wildfires are ravaging thousands of square miles on the West Coast, though officials say that this wildfire season has been tamer than average. Still, responding to these fires has proven costly, and the Obama administration is reevaluating how it pays for fighting them.
 

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July 26, 2014 | NPR · Hezbollah has been a longtime ally of Hamas, but during this most recent conflict between Israel and Gaza they've taken a sideline role. NPR's Scott Simon talks to the BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut.
 

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July 27, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Ukraine near the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 has international investigators staying away. NPR's Arun Rath talks with OSCE's Michael Bociurkiw about the investigation.
 

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Atlanta (Ga.)

Jul 30, 2012 — Growing up near Atlanta, Karin Slaughter learned that tragic crimes can happen to anyone — even children. She says she sets her crime fiction in Atlanta as a way to honor the city's people and turning points, from the election of its first black mayor to the 1996 Olympics.
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May 17, 2012 — Novelist Tayari Jones explores a father's deception of his family, while historian David McCullough looks at 19th-century Americans in Paris, Roy Blount Jr. revels in verbal curiosities, writer Bill James reflects on true-crime stories, and journalist Diana Henriques probes the Ponzi scheme of Bernie Madoff.
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Jul 17, 2011 — NPR coverage of Them: A Novel by Nathan McCall. News, author interviews, critics' picks and more.
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Jul 15, 2011 — NPR coverage of The Law of the White Circle by Thornwell Jacobs, W. Fitzhugh Brundage, Paul Stephen Hudson, and Walter White. News, author interviews, critics' picks and more.
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Jun 25, 2011 — NPR's Lynn Neary taps three book critics — Laura Miller, Ron Charles and Rigoberto Gonzalez — to get their picks for the best summer reading.
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May 19, 2011 — In Tayari Jones' novel Silver Sparrow, two young girls grow up as secret sisters. They are daughters of the same man, but have different mothers. And just one of them knows that the other exists.
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Oct 6, 2008 — In an effort to reconnect with his Jewish faith, Georgia-native Benyamin Cohen explored the Christianity across the "Bible Belt" of America. He documented his experiences in My Jesus Year: A Rabbi's Son Wanders the Bible Belt in Search of His Own Faith.
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Jan 29, 2008 — "Gentrification" is one of those words that sets some people's teeth on edge. Does it mean improving a neighborhood or displacing longtime residents? Journalist and professor Nathan McCall takes on the topic in novel form and with a novel twist in Them.
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May 11, 2007 — When Eva Rutland saw her four children go off to school in 1950s Sacramento, it was in a new era of integration. Her memoir of that time, When We Were Colored, is now being republished by her daughter.
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Sep 22, 2006 — On Sept. 22, 1906, thousands of whites in Atlanta joined together downtown and began attacking and killing the city's blacks. Dozens were murdered in violence that continued for four days. But the riot hasn't been commemorated or taught in schools — until now.
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