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April 18, 2014 | NPR · The agreement calls on all parties to refrain from violence, requires that illegally-armed groups disarm and that control of government buildings be returned to Ukrainian authorities.
 
April 18, 2014 | NPR · President Obama said enrollment under the Affordable Care Act reached 8 million after the deadline was extended by 2 weeks. The figure represents a turnaround from the disastrous debut of the website.
 
April 18, 2014 | NPR · Morning Edition spent a lot of time recently reporting from the U.S.-Mexico border. President Obama has deported 2 million people from the U.S. But many say that number is misleading.
 

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April 19, 2014 | NPR · The military's training center at Fort Irwin in California is complete with mock Middle Eastern villages. But as the U.S. combat mission in Afghanistan winds down, how will this facility change?
 
April 19, 2014 | NPR · In the Ukrainian city of Donetsk, the opposing camps seem increasingly entrenched, despite a diplomatic effort to ease tensions. Pro-Russian forces refuse to leave occupied buildings and public squares in the east. It's an uneasy Easter weekend and neither side is willing to budge.
 
April 19, 2014 | NPR · Russia is in the middle of a planned upgrade and expansion of its military forces, but global affairs professor Mark Galeotti tells NPR's Arun Rath that Russia's military has its limits.
 

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April 19, 2014 | NPR · The search continues for hundreds of people, mostly students, who were on board a South Korean ferry when it sank this week. Correspondent Anthony Kuhn shares the latest with NPR's Wade Goodwyn.
 

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April 20, 2014 | NPR · Monday is the 2014 Boston Marathon. Security will be tight, and this year's race will be an emotional event that will be about more than who wins.
 

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Atlanta (Ga.)

Jul 30, 2012 — Growing up near Atlanta, Karin Slaughter learned that tragic crimes can happen to anyone — even children. She says she sets her crime fiction in Atlanta as a way to honor the city's people and turning points, from the election of its first black mayor to the 1996 Olympics.
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May 17, 2012 — Novelist Tayari Jones explores a father's deception of his family, while historian David McCullough looks at 19th-century Americans in Paris, Roy Blount Jr. revels in verbal curiosities, writer Bill James reflects on true-crime stories, and journalist Diana Henriques probes the Ponzi scheme of Bernie Madoff.
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Jul 17, 2011 — NPR coverage of Them: A Novel by Nathan McCall. News, author interviews, critics' picks and more.
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Jul 15, 2011 — NPR coverage of The Law of the White Circle by Thornwell Jacobs, W. Fitzhugh Brundage, Paul Stephen Hudson, and Walter White. News, author interviews, critics' picks and more.
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Jun 25, 2011 — NPR's Lynn Neary taps three book critics — Laura Miller, Ron Charles and Rigoberto Gonzalez — to get their picks for the best summer reading.
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May 19, 2011 — In Tayari Jones' novel Silver Sparrow, two young girls grow up as secret sisters. They are daughters of the same man, but have different mothers. And just one of them knows that the other exists.
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Oct 6, 2008 — In an effort to reconnect with his Jewish faith, Georgia-native Benyamin Cohen explored the Christianity across the "Bible Belt" of America. He documented his experiences in My Jesus Year: A Rabbi's Son Wanders the Bible Belt in Search of His Own Faith.
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Jan 29, 2008 — "Gentrification" is one of those words that sets some people's teeth on edge. Does it mean improving a neighborhood or displacing longtime residents? Journalist and professor Nathan McCall takes on the topic in novel form and with a novel twist in Them.
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May 11, 2007 — When Eva Rutland saw her four children go off to school in 1950s Sacramento, it was in a new era of integration. Her memoir of that time, When We Were Colored, is now being republished by her daughter.
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Sep 22, 2006 — On Sept. 22, 1906, thousands of whites in Atlanta joined together downtown and began attacking and killing the city's blacks. Dozens were murdered in violence that continued for four days. But the riot hasn't been commemorated or taught in schools — until now.
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