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July 29, 2014 | NPR · House and Senate negotiators reached a compromise, $17 billion agreement to improve medical care for veterans. The deal comes in the final week before Congress leaves town for a monthlong recess.
 
July 29, 2014 | NPR · Washington Post reporter Liz Sly tells Renee Montagne that U.S. arms may be flowing to moderate Syrian rebels, but the aid seems to be too little too late to affect the course of the civil war.
 
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July 28, 2014 | NPR · The militant group threatens to kill parents who immunize their children. As a result, polio has come roaring back in Pakistan. Eradication now hinges on whether the country can control the virus.
 

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July 29, 2014 | KERA · After caring for Ebola patients for several months in West Africa, Dr. Kent Brantly noticed last week that he had symptoms. The 33-year-old immediately put himself into a Liberian isolation ward.
 
July 29, 2014 | NPR · Virologist Thomas Geisbert has spent decades studying Ebola and other hemorrhagic fevers. He speaks to Audie Cornish about the current Ebola outbreak, the worst in history, and how it might be contained this time around.
 
July 29, 2014 | NPR · The Eid festival, which celebrates the end of Ramadan, serves as a time for visiting relatives and exchanging gifts. But one family's holiday in Gaza traces the death and displacement wrought by the war between Hamas and Israel.
 

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July 26, 2014 | NPR · Hezbollah has been a longtime ally of Hamas, but during this most recent conflict between Israel and Gaza they've taken a sideline role. NPR's Scott Simon talks to the BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut.
 

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July 27, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Ukraine near the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 has international investigators staying away. NPR's Arun Rath talks with OSCE's Michael Bociurkiw about the investigation.
 

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Maryland

Jul 4, 2013 — Francis Scott Key wrote the words to the ballad after witnessing the Battle for Baltimore in 1814. According to author Steve Vogel, after it was published, Key's composition took the country by storm. But it didn't become the national anthem until more than 100 years later.
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Jun 1, 2013 — A summer job in a Baltimore funeral home turned into a nine-year career and lifelong passion for Sheri Booker. Her coming-of-age memoir recalls tears and trade secrets of the mortuary business.
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Aug 18, 2011 — A growing number of colleges are assigning "common reads" — books that all incoming freshmen must read for their first week on campus. Wes Moore, author of the common read The Other Wes Moore, and student Sirena Wurth discuss what students gain from reading collectively.
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Jun 25, 2011 — The Cone sisters of Baltimore had a passion — and a talent — for art collection. In the early 20th century, they patronized and befriended great contemporary artists such as Pablo Picasso and Henri Matisse. An exhibition of their collection is now on display at the Jewish Museum of New York.
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Jan 12, 2011 — Novelist Peter Carey returns with a funny riff on de Tocqueville's America, while David Remnick looks at the rise of President Obama, Rhodes scholar Wes Moore considers the prison life he might have lived, and Simon Johnson and James Kwak argue that America's megabanks should be cut down to size.
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Aug 18, 2010 — The days are getting shorter, and it's hard to breeze though pages like you did on vacation just a few short weeks ago. Critic Cord Jefferson offers five nonfiction titles — true stories that will gently ease you out of the summer months, and back into the routines of fall.
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Aug 16, 2010
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Jun 19, 2009Atlantic contributing editor Ta-Nehisi Coates writes about growing up in West Baltimore during the post Civil Rights era in his memoir, The Beautiful Struggle.
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Feb 18, 2009Atlantic contributing editor Ta-Nehisi Coates describes growing up with a father who was a member of the Black Panthers in his new memoir, The Beautiful Struggle.
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Jun 9, 2008 — In The Beautiful Struggle Ta-Nehisi Coates writes about growing up in West Baltimore and escaping the temptations of the city's streets. His memoir explains two very different kinds of knowledge — the language of the corner and the political consciousness taught to him by his father.
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