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July 10, 2014 | NPR · From climate change to counterterrorism, an increasing number of issues require China's cooperation. U.S. officials are in Beijing for 2 days of meetings known as the Strategic and Economic Dialogue.
 
July 10, 2014 | NPR · After years of stunning growth, China's go-go real estate market is in retreat. It has been one of the engines driving the world's second-largest economy, so economists are watching it closely.
 
July 10, 2014 | WWNO · Nagin has been sentenced to 10 years in federal prison. His corruption case involves the trading of city contracts and favors for cash and kickbacks. He left office in 2010 and was indicted in 2013.
 

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July 9, 2014 | NPR · In a state that hosts one of the nation's closest Senate races, the president spoke about the women's issues that could turn the election. But Sen. Mark Udall opted not to appear alongside Obama.
 
July 9, 2014 | NPR · After two decades of lobbying for the Employment Non-Discrimination Act, the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force has decided to withdraw its support for the bill. In the wake of the Supreme Court's Hobby Lobby decision, the group fears that the ENDA's broad religious exemption would allow companies to discriminate against employees for their sexual orientation or gender identity. Melissa Block speaks with the group's executive director, Rae Carey, about the move.
 
July 9, 2014 | NPR · U.S.-German relations were further strained Wednesday over reports that prosecutors in Germany are investigating a German soldier accused of spying for the U.S. It's the second such case in a week.
 

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July 5, 2014 | NPR · In the year since Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi was ousted, a military man was elected president and a budding insurgency has grown, as correspondent Leila Fadel tells NPR's Tamara Keith.
 

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July 6, 2014 | NPR · Tensions are high following the murder of three young Israelis and a Palestinian teen. Relatives of the murdered Palestinian say his American cousin was beaten by Israeli police during a protest.
 

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Civilization

Dec 27, 2013 — Charles Krauthammer's Things That Matter, at No. 3, features essays on sports, politics and culture.
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Sep 7, 2013 — Author Jesse Walker argues that believing in shadowy cabals and ominous secrets isn't just for people on the margins — it's as American as apple pie. He says that our nation's paranoia stretches back to the colonial era, and that some conspiracy theories are believed by a majority of Americans.
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Aug 5, 2013 — Earlier this summer, NPR's Backseat Book Club — our book club for young readers — asked you to weigh in on your favorite books for kids age 9-14. We heard from more than 2,000 of you, and our expert panel has whittled your hundreds and hundreds of nominations down to a list of 100 great reads.
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Jul 5, 2013 — Tash Aw's Five Star Billionaire, set in Shanghai, explores the dynamic tumult of that city. Reviewer Ellah Allfrey says that Aw, with gentle compassion and keen understanding, shows his characters succumb to the lure of a city where everything seems possible.
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Mar 28, 2013 — The American South as a region has been defined by change since the Civil War. Twenty years after she left the South, Georgia native Tracy Thompson went on a four-year journey to explore what it means to be Southern in the 21st century. In The New Mind of the South, she shares her discoveries.
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Dec 11, 2012 — Nigerian writer Wole Soyinka was the first black African to win the Nobel Prize in literature, in 1986. He tells NPR's Michel Martin that the best part about it was the money. His latest work, Of Africa, is a study of the continent that has dominated his career.
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Oct 26, 2012 — Barzun authored dozens of books and essays on everything from philosophy to music to baseball. He died Thursday, just one month shy of his 105th birthday. "I don't know anybody who had such a Renaissance mind," says his friend and colleague, Prof. Henry Graff.
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Sep 20, 2012 — Thomas Frank analyzes the U.S. political divide, Siddhartha Deb looks into the heart of India, Emmanuel Carrere writes about the 2004 tsunami, and comic actress Mindy Kaling laughs at everything. In fiction, Britain's Alan Hollinghurst follows the evolution of English society.
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Jul 21, 2012 — From the ultimate Olympic reference book to an account of the last London Games, bibliophile cabbie Will Grozier recommends books that put both the 2012 Games and their host city in context.
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Jun 26, 2012 — Anthony Heilbut's essay collection, The Fan Who Knew Too Much, features reflections on the Queen of Soul, soap operas and Jewish immigrants. The highlight of this sometimes harsh collection, says Michael Schaub, is a history of LGBT contributions to gospel.
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