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August 19, 2014 | NPR · More than one week after the shooting death of an unarmed black teenager in a St. Louis suburb, protests continue. On Monday night, police fired tear gas and stun grenades to disperse demonstrators.
 
August 19, 2014 | NPR · The actions in Ferguson, Mo., have inspired talk about the militarization of U.S. police departments. The real question, is whether police have become militarized in their attitude toward the public.
 
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August 19, 2014 | KHN · Across the U.S., jails hold many more people with serious mental illness than state hospitals do. San Antonio is reweaving its safety net for the mentally ill — and saving $10 million annually.
 

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August 19, 2014 | NPR · Dr. Joanne Liu of Doctors Without Borders says fear and a lack of sense of urgency has kept the international community in their home countries rather than stepping up to the plate in West Africa.
 
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August 19, 2014 | NPR · The type of Ebola erupting in West Africa is closely related to one found 2,500 miles away — the distance between Boston and San Francisco. How did the virus spread so far without anyone noticing?
 
August 19, 2014 | NPR · Iranian poet and women's rights advocate Simin Behbahani has died. Her work probed the social and political challenges that faced Iran after its Islamic Revolution. She was 87.
 

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August 16, 2014 | NPR · Both Ukraine and Russia say they're trying to send supplies to residents in eastern Ukraine. But with tensions on both sides running high, that aid may take a while to arrive.
 

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August 17, 2014 | NPR · American fighter jets and drones carried out airstrikes against Islamist targets near the Mosul Dam in northern Iraq on Saturday. A breach of the dam could threaten entire cities.
 

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Public prosecutors

Feb 29, 2012 — Former Los Angeles prosecutor Marcia Clark debuts as a mystery writer, and Julian Barnes returns with stories of love. Robert Putnam and David Campbell look at American religion, Ron Rosenbaum warns of the potential for nuclear war, and Bing West evaluates military failures in Afghanistan.
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Jun 16, 2011 — If a fancy vacation won't fit into the summer budget this year, a good book can take you on a journey instead. Salon.com book critic Laura Miller shares her top picks for books that can take you to new places and cultures. And Bharati Mukherjee takes us on a trip to South Asia with Miss New India.
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May 11, 2011 — Summer reading is clearly on the horizon, with a new novel from Scott Turow, P.D. James musing on the mystery genre, John Vaillant on the Siberian tiger, S.C. Gwynne on the Comanche Nation and time to catch up on Bob Woodward's look at Obama's Wars.
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Apr 19, 2011 — Fifteen years after she led the prosecution against O.J. Simpson in one of the most public trials of the century, Marcia Clark returns to the courtroom. But this time, it's to make her fiction debut as the writer of a new legal thriller novel, Guilt by Association..
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Jun 17, 2010 — It's no mystery that the Swedes know how to write really good ones. But among the authors with the gift to spin out superior thrillers is a trio of American women and, oddly, the guy who gave us Mr. Magoo. Now, the suspense is over: Mystery fiction aficionado Maureen Corrigan relishes the best of the whodunits.
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Oct 8, 2008 — An internal Justice Department investigation has concluded that the controversial U.S. attorney firings of 2006 were of a partisan political nature. One of the seven fired attorneys, Iglesias discusses his book, In Justice, an insider's account of the affair.
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Aug 23, 2007 — From the Antique Man's giant ball of string in Fells Point, to the crab cake lunch downtown, Laura Lippman loves Baltimore. Despite the city's crime and other problems, the crime novelist says its flaws are what make it an interesting place.
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Feb 8, 2007 — Federal prosecutor Stanley Alpert was kidnapped off the streets of Manhattan nine years ago. His new book, The Birthday Party, is a memoir of how he survived the 25-hour ordeal. Alpert writes of befriending his kidnappers and helping the FBI apprehend the gang.
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Dec 1, 2006 — Laura Lippman began writing novels while working fulltime as a journalist at The Baltimore Sun. She has written 11, including nine about former journalist Tess Monaghan, an "accidental private eye" with a knack for solving crime on Baltimore's streets.
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