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April 17, 2014 | NPR · Scientists and food activists are launching a campaign to promote seeds that can be freely shared, rather than protected through patents and licenses. They call it the Open Source Seed Initiative.
 
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April 17, 2014 | NPR · A typical UPS truck now has hundreds of sensors on it. That's changing the way UPS drivers work — and it foreshadows changes coming for workers throughout the economy.
 
April 17, 2014 | NPR · Brazil is the spiritual home of soccer and a world powerhouse in the sport. It's woven into the Brazilian psyche. Wins and losses have had repercussions in other realms — including politics.
 

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April 16, 2014 | NPR · Ukrainian tanks arrived in the city of Kramatorsk Wednesday morning. By the time they rolled out of the city, they were flying Russian flags. People in Kramatorsk tell the story of what happened.
 
April 16, 2014 | NPR · NATO has announced a strengthening of its forces near the alliance's eastern border. Gen. George Joulwan, the former NATO supreme allied commander for Europe, discusses the plan.
 
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April 16, 2014 | NPR · A 325 million-year-old fossil find shows that the gill structures of modern sharks are actually quite different from their ancient ancestors.
 

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April 12, 2014 | NPR · As pro-Russia demonstrators continue their tense standoff in Eastern Ukraine, police are conspicuously absent from city streets.
 

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April 13, 2014 | NPR · As the anniversary of last year's marathon bombing approaches, NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with correspondent Carrie Johnson about the investigation and legal wrangling yet to come.
 

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Imagination

Mar 21, 2012 — Some companies are helping their employees become more creative and increasing their productivity, says science writer Jonah Lehrer in his new book, Imagine.
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Mar 19, 2012 — In his new book, Imagine, Jonah Lehrer explores the art and science of original thinking — from Shakespearean tragedies to the invention of masking tape to Nike's "Just Do It" campaign. And when you get stuck? "Take a very long, warm shower," Lehrer says.
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Feb 15, 2012 — Under the impending threat of Nazi invasion, a tiny Jewish town in 1939 Austria decides to reinvent its past. Ramona Ausubel's debut novel, No One Is Here Except All of Us, contains echoes of Gabriel Garcia Marquez and Isaac Bashevis Singer.
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Jan 24, 2012 — Theodor Geisel's first book for kids was rejected 27 times before it was finally published in 1937. And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street was inspired by a very ordinary street in Geisel's Massachusetts hometown.
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Sep 25, 2011 — Awesome Man is, well, "basically awesome," as he puts it. He can fly as high as a satellite and shoot positronic rays out of his eyeballs. And he's the star of Pulitzer Prize-winning author Michael Chabon's new kids' book. Chabon says superheroes let kids hope for a day they might fly.
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Sep 23, 2011 — Read an excerpt from Michael Chabon's The Astonishing Secret of Awesome Man.
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Jul 14, 2011 — NPR coverage of That's How! by Christoph Niemann. News, author interviews, critics' picks and more.
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Jun 22, 2011 — Illustrator Christoph Niemann's work ranges from whimsical children's books to poignant cover art for The New Yorker, but he's not interested in ending up in a museum. "I get a much bigger kick out of having my image seen like a million times for like 20 seconds," he says.
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Dec 10, 2010 — It's that time of year again! Susan Stamberg chats with three independent booksellers about their favorite reads of the year, from an atlas of remote islands to a children's book about feminist heroes.
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Sep 9, 2010 — Nine months after the quake in Haiti, Haitian-born author Edwidge Danticat is sharing the earthquake story with an audience that was largely shielded from it — children. Eight Days is a book about a boy who gets buried in the rubble and is not rescued until eight days later.
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