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August 28, 2014 | NPR · For the first time, researchers have tracked the spread of Ebola, almost in real time, during an outbreak. The virus is quickly changing its genetic code. But it's unclear what the mutations mean.
 
August 29, 2014 | NPR · French President Francois Hollande is under pressure to fix the country's economy, which is overburdened by regulation and failing a generation of young people. He's also facing calls for austerity.
 
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August 29, 2014 | NPR · Congressman and former Republican vice presidential nominee Paul Ryan discusses his new book, The Way Forward: Renewing the American Idea.
 

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August 30, 2014 | NPR · In Ukraine, worried officials in the southeastern part of the country beefed up their defenses on Saturday as rebel forces slowly moved west following the recent capture of a strategic seaside town.
 
August 30, 2014 | NPR · Arun Rath talks to former U.S. Ambassador to Ukraine Steven Pifer about NATO and EU options for confronting Russian aggression in Ukraine.
 
August 30, 2014 | NPR · More than 500 people may have traveled from the U.K. to Syria to fight in its civil war. Arun Rath talks to Jessica Stern, author of Terror In The Name Of God, about how it's drawing Westerners.
 

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August 30, 2014 | NPR · Ukrainian forces are defending the port city of Novoazovsk from what they say is a Russian invasion. Scott Simon talks to correspondent Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson.
 

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August 24, 2014 | NPR · In the wake of violent clashes between protesters and police in Ferguson, Mo., President Obama is ordering a review of the federal programs that help local police departments purchase military gear.
 

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Prohibition

May 13, 2013 — In softcover nonfiction, Tom Reiss explores the inspiration for The Count of Monte Cristo, Ben MacIntyre depicts a World War II effort to fool the Nazis, and Justin Lee recounts his struggle for acceptance as a gay Christian. In fiction, Dennis Lehane imagines a Prohibition-era mobster.
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Oct 2, 2012 — Dennis Lehane's latest novel moves from the modern Boston of books like Mystic River to Prohibition-era Florida. Reviewer Jennifer Reese says the story is weighed down by too much lovingly researched period detail, and not enough attention to character development.
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Oct 2, 2012 — Author Dennis Lehane says he has always loved the clothes, cars and movies of the Prohibition era — which might be why he has set his new novel there. Live By Night doesn't tell the usual Prohibition story about whiskey smugglers — instead it heads south to Florida for a gritty tale of rumrunning.
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Sep 25, 2012 — Author Dennis Lehane's latest novel is a faced-paced tale of organized crime and betrayal, set during Prohibition. Live by Night follows Joe Coughlin from his days as a small-time Boston hood to success as the rum-running boss of the South.
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Jun 10, 2011 — Drinking didn't stop in the United States from 1920 to 1933 — it just went underground. Author Daniel Okrent discusses the lasting cultural and political impact of Prohibition in his book, Last Call.
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Jun 8, 2011 — Actor James Franco details the lives of flailing California teens in his debut story collection, while Michael Capuzzo profiles a real life crime-fighting society. Daniel Okrent probes Prohibition, Sebastian Mallaby takes a hard look at hedge funds, and Laura Ingraham opens President Obama's "diaries."
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May 10, 2010 — Drinking didn't stop in the United States from 1920 to 1933 — it just went underground. Author Daniel Okrent discusses the lasting cultural and political impact of Prohibition in his new book, Last Call.
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Mar 16, 2007 — Prohibition was meant to stop the sale of liquor, but it didn't. In New York City, which had as many as 32,000 speakeasies, the policy's failure was flagrant. In his new book, Dry Manhattan, Michael A. Lerner examines what happened.
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