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August 1, 2014 | NPR · Renee Montagne talks with the head of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Dr. Thomas Frieden, for the latest news about the Ebola outbreak in West Africa.
 
August 1, 2014 | NPR · CIA director John Brennan apologized to Sen. Dianne Feinstein, who had accused the CIA of spying on her committee's computers. Brennan at first denied it.
 
August 1, 2014 | NPR · It's one of the most popular items, but often it seems to be as far as humanly possible from the entrance. The Planet Money team looks at two very different theories about why that is.
 

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August 1, 2014 | NPR · House Republicans are delaying their August recess, sticking around Washington to try passing a bill meant to address the border crisis. Democrats and President Obama have already voiced their opposition to the bill on the table.
 
August 1, 2014 | NPR · Regular political commentators, E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and David Brooks of The New York Times, discuss the beleaguered border bill in the House and the shattered cease-fire in Gaza.
 
August 1, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Gaza took an ominous turn Friday, as a 72-hour humanitarian cease-fire fell apart within 90 minutes and the Israeli military announced its belief that one of its soldiers was captured by Hamas militants.
 

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July 26, 2014 | NPR · Hezbollah has been a longtime ally of Hamas, but during this most recent conflict between Israel and Gaza they've taken a sideline role. NPR's Scott Simon talks to the BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut.
 

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July 27, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Ukraine near the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 has international investigators staying away. NPR's Arun Rath talks with OSCE's Michael Bociurkiw about the investigation.
 

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Men

Dec 14, 2013 — In a recent ruling, the Indian Supreme Court reinstated a colonial-era ban on gay sex. Two authors react to the news with two very different recommendations. Manil Suri suggests that readers check out a book of interviews, while Ruth Franklin turns to Victorian England for a look at a similar law's effects.
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Oct 13, 2013 — Author Antoine Wilson suggests bypassing Proust in favor of a far shorter choice: Nicholson Baker's 1988 novel, which shares the internal monologue of a businessman on an escalator. Shoelaces, drinking straws and the corporate culture of men's bathrooms undergo thorough analysis in this slim book, which Wilson calls "relentlessly perceptive."
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Oct 6, 2013 — Phyllis Chesler met Abdul-Kareem — a young, wealthy Muslim — in college. They fell in love, got married and, in 1961, traveled to his native Afghanistan together. There, Chesler soon found herself a virtual prisoner — an Afghan wife with no rights. An American Bride in Kabul is her memoir of that experience.
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Apr 5, 2013 — On the heels of Chinua Achebe's death, the Nigerian author's Things Fall Apart appears at No. 12.
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Mar 25, 2013 — In softcover nonfiction, Cheryl Strayed recounts her solo trek on the Pacific Crest Trail, Blaine Harden unlocks the secrets of a North Korean prison camp, and Leymah Gbowee reflects on becoming a Liberian peace activist. In fiction, Rachel Joyce's tale of an unexpected journey arrives in paperback.
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Mar 22, 2013 — The world-famous Nigerian author Chinua Achebe has died. Annalisa Quinn reflects on the legacy of Achebe's novel Things Fall Apart.
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Mar 22, 2013 — His seminal work played a critical role in establishing post-colonial African literature. Achebe also taught Africana Studies at Brown University.
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Aug 10, 2012The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry, about a man's journey to see a dying friend, debuts at No. 7.
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Jul 22, 2012 — Harold Fry is retired and sedentary — and in no way the sort of person who'd spontaneously decide to walk the length of England to visit a dying friend. Rachel Joyce's new novel, The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry, follows Fry as he does just that — and finds emotional awakening along the way.
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Jul 17, 2011 — NPR coverage of Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe. News, author interviews, critics' picks and more.
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