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July 24, 2014 | NPR · Seven years after the subprime mortgage crisis, the U.S. economy has not yet fully recovered. Now two economists have come up with new evidence about what's holding the economy back.
 
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July 24, 2014 | NPR · On Capitol Hill, dogs and their handlers have made the case that all U.S. military dogs should be brought home from war — and treated with the respect they've earned on the battlefield.
 
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July 24, 2014 | NPR · Dozens of children have filed complaints saying they were subjected to inhumane treatment at Border Patrol stations. The complaints center on the holding cells, referred to as "freezers" by migrants.
 

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July 24, 2014 | NPR · A United Nations school, which was being used to shelter displaced Gazans awaiting evacuation, came under fire from a missile or shelling. The attack reportedly killed 15 people. Palestinian officials blame Israeli shelling; Israel says it may have been Hamas rockets that fell short of their target.
 
July 24, 2014 | NPR · The war in Gaza is unfolding between Israel and Hamas, but the Palestinian Authority, based in the West Bank, is also involved in efforts to end the fighting. The Palestine Liberation Organization's diplomatic representative to the U.S., Maen Areikat, speaks with Robert Siegel about the causes of the conflict and the possible consequences of a cease-fire.
 
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July 24, 2014 | NPR · If no contract deal is reached by July 31, Metropolitan Opera General Manager Peter Gelb has warned union workers to plan for a work stoppage the next day.
 

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July 19, 2014 | NPR · NPR's Scott Simon talks with David Herzsenhorn of The New York Times about the latest developments in Ukraine, where a Malaysia Airlines passenger plane was downed on Thursday, killing 298 people.
 

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July 20, 2014 | NPR · NPR's Arun Rath gets the latest from correspondent Corey Flintoff at the site of last week's downing of a Malaysian jetliner in Eastern Ukraine.
 

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Environmental aspects

Aug 27, 2013 — In softcover nonfiction, Elizabeth Cline explores the high costs of cheap clothing, D.T. Max sheds light on the life and death of author David Foster Wallace, and Marco Roth reflects on his intellectual upbringing on New York's Upper West Side.
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May 2, 2013 — Since a garment factory collapsed last month in Dhaka, killing more than 400 people, ethical fashion has been in the spotlight. Elizabeth Cline, author of Overdressed: The Shockingly High Price of Cheap Fashion, explains the economy that created this tragedy and what we can do to fix it.
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Sep 5, 2012 — Over the 20th century, America's "growing season," a proxy for warmer temperatures, has been getting longer. And scientists say the trend is exactly what they expect to see as greenhouse gases in the atmosphere increase.
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Aug 14, 2012 — "We've had time to act — and essentially we haven't acted," says science journalist Michael Lemonick. He describes the threats posed by climate change in his new book, Global Weirdness: Severe Storms, Deadly Heat Waves, Relentless Drought, Rising Seas, and the Weather of the Future.
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Aug 3, 2012 — Charles Mann's 1493 explores the lesser-known consequences of Columbus' voyage. It debuts at No. 2.
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Jul 27, 2012 — When Columbus crossed the Atlantic in 1492, his journey prompted the exchange of not only information but also food, animals, insects, plants and disease between the continents. In a new book, Charles C. Mann describes the aftermath of Columbus' arrival in the Americas.
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Jul 25, 2012 — Stephen King returns to the scene of JFK's assassination, while Ali Smith presents an intricate tale of a dinner party gone wrong. In nonfiction, Charles C. Mann reassesses Columbus, Juliet Eilperin investigates sharks, and Paul Hendrickson revisits Hemingway.
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Jul 14, 2012 — In some of the dirtiest places on Earth, author and environmentalist Andrew Blackwell found something worth looking at. His book, Visit Sunny Chernobyl, tours the deforestation of the Amazon, the oil sand mines in Canada and the world's most polluted city, located in China.
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Jun 8, 2012 — This week, the Library of Congress announced that Natasha Trethewey, the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Native Guard, will be the next poet laureate of the United States. Trethewey, a native of Mississippi, is the first Southern poet laureate since 1986.
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Oct 14, 2011 — Bill Bryson unearths the history of households and domesticity in At Home. It debuts at No. 5.
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