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July 24, 2014 | NPR · Seven years after the subprime mortgage crisis, the U.S. economy has not yet fully recovered. Now two economists have come up with new evidence about what's holding the economy back.
 
July 24, 2014 | NPR · Military war dogs serve combat tours, save lives and suffer injuries like the soldiers they serve. On Capitol Hill this week, dogs and their handlers made the case that all dogs should be brought home from war and treated with the respect they've earned.
 
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July 24, 2014 | NPR · Dozens of children have filed complaints saying they were subjected to inhumane treatment at Border Patrol stations. The complaints center on the holding cells, referred to as "freezers" by migrants.
 

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July 23, 2014 | NPR · The remains of passengers of the downed Malaysia Airlines flight arrived in the Netherlands, on what has been a national day of mourning. Most of those killed in the jet that was brought down over Ukraine were Dutch. Robert Siegel talks with Thomas Erdbrink of The New York Times, who is in the Netherlands.
 
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July 23, 2014 | NPR · Even before the double calamity of its two downed flights, Malaysia Airlines was trying to adapt to momentous shifts in Asia's aviation industry. Now, it faces either bankruptcy or privatization.
 
July 23, 2014 | NPR · An uncontacted Amazonian tribe has ended its isolation in Brazil. Fiona Watson, the field and research director for Survival International, explains why this tribal people left its village.
 

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July 19, 2014 | NPR · NPR's Scott Simon talks with David Herzsenhorn of The New York Times about the latest developments in Ukraine, where a Malaysia Airlines passenger plane was downed on Thursday, killing 298 people.
 

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July 20, 2014 | NPR · NPR's Arun Rath gets the latest from correspondent Corey Flintoff at the site of last week's downing of a Malaysian jetliner in Eastern Ukraine.
 

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London

Jul 22, 2014 — Most of us, when we think of Victorian London, think of the work of Charles Dickens. Historian Judith Flanders' uses Dickens' words to paint a vivid portrait of a vibrant but troubled city.
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Jul 10, 2014 — Jacqueline Winspear's debut mystery, Maisie Dobbs, set in England around World War I, came out in paperback a decade ago. A new edition testifies to the enduring allure of the traditional mystery.
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Aug 2, 2013 — Following news that Robert Galbraith is really J.K. Rowling, The Cuckoo's Calling jumps to No. 1.
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Jan 25, 2013 — Edmund De Waal's The Hare With Amber Eyes returns to the list at No. 15.
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Dec 12, 2012 — Some of these novels will touch your heart; others will challenge your mind. One will make you laugh — a few might make you cry. But all of these books recommended by NPR's Lynn Neary will give you and your friends plenty to talk about.
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Oct 17, 2012 — In the age of the Internet, data is everywhere — the question is how to use it. Author Doug Lemov recommends three books about the power of information. What is your favorite number-crunching book? Tell us in the comments.
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Sep 20, 2012 — Thomas Frank analyzes the U.S. political divide, Siddhartha Deb looks into the heart of India, Emmanuel Carrere writes about the 2004 tsunami, and comic actress Mindy Kaling laughs at everything. In fiction, Britain's Alan Hollinghurst follows the evolution of English society.
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Sep 14, 2012 — Zadie Smith's latest, NW, follows the lives of four kids from a London project. It debuts at No. 2.
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Jul 21, 2012 — From the ultimate Olympic reference book to an account of the last London Games, bibliophile cabbie Will Grozier recommends books that put both the 2012 Games and their host city in context.
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Jun 30, 2012 — British ceramicist Edmund de Waal is exhibiting his work at Waddesdon Manor, the historic country retreat of his distant cousin Lord Jacob Rothschild. The manor's lavishly decorated rooms are an unlikely space for such minimalist works, but the collaboration tells a story of collection, belonging and loss.
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