Latest News from NPR

on:

NCPR is supported by:

 
Hourly Newscast
4 min., 45 sec.

Programs

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Latest Features:
July 29, 2014 | NPR · House and Senate negotiators reached a compromise, $17 billion agreement to improve medical care for veterans. The deal comes in the final week before Congress leaves town for a monthlong recess.
 
July 29, 2014 | NPR · Washington Post reporter Liz Sly tells Renee Montagne that U.S. arms may be flowing to moderate Syrian rebels, but the aid seems to be too little too late to affect the course of the civil war.
 
AFP/Getty Images
July 28, 2014 | NPR · The militant group threatens to kill parents who immunize their children. As a result, polio has come roaring back in Pakistan. Eradication now hinges on whether the country can control the virus.
 

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Latest Features:
July 28, 2014 | NPR · A new salvo has been fired in the fight over teacher tenure. A group led by former TV anchor Campbell Brown filed a complaint in New York state court, arguing that tenure laws are preventing the state from providing every child with the "sound, basic education" its constitution guarantees.
 
WNYC
July 28, 2014 | NPR · Why are so many low-income and minority kids getting second-class educations in the U.S.? That question is at the center of the heated debate about tenure protections and who gets them.
 
July 28, 2014 | NPR · Only one movie in July, Transformers: Age of Extinction, has broken the 100 million mark during its opening weekend. Box office receipts all summer have proven anemic. Paul Dergarabedian, a senior media analyst with RENTRAK, talks to Audie Cornish about the box office slump.
 

Latest Saturday rundown




WE Saturday Feature

July 26, 2014 | NPR · Hezbollah has been a longtime ally of Hamas, but during this most recent conflict between Israel and Gaza they've taken a sideline role. NPR's Scott Simon talks to the BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut.
 

Latest Sunday rundown


WE Sunday Feature

July 27, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Ukraine near the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 has international investigators staying away. NPR's Arun Rath talks with OSCE's Michael Bociurkiw about the investigation.
 

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Civil rights

Oct 12, 2013 — Author Denise Spellberg's book draws parallels between the beliefs of the founding father and religious tolerance in the United States today.
Launch in player | Comments |
Aug 14, 2013 — Before the nation's attention turned to the March on Washington, William Moore was making his own pilgrimage for racial equality. He intended to walk from Tennessee to Jackson, Miss., to ask the Mississippi governor to end segregation — but the Baltimore mail carrier never reached his destination.
Comments |
Aug 8, 2013 — A lengthy interview with Leonard Bernstein. One man's quest to understand obsessive Phish fandom. A look at the life of a jazz legend. We survey these and other highlights of music-themed books worth reading this summer.
Comments |
Jul 12, 2013 — Mark Kurlansky's Ready for a Brand New Beat chronicles the spectacular success of the 1964 Motown hit "Dancing in the Street." Reviewer Cord Jefferson says that while much of the book feels like filler, it sings when Kurlansky examines all the controversy one song created.
Launch in player | Comments |
Jul 7, 2013 — Mark Kurlansky's book Ready for a Brand New Beat is a history of the song "Dancing in the Street." It was the soundtrack for the summer of 1964, when race riots and war protests spread across the United States.
Launch in player | Comments |
Jun 30, 2013 — Novels dealing in privacy-free futures aren't new. But they're rapidly becoming more relevant. Author Max Barry chooses three dystopian novels that are both thought-provoking and chillingly plausible. What's your favorite futuristic novel? Tell us in the comments.
Comments |
Feb 16, 2013 — When the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his "I Have a Dream" speech 50 years ago, Leonard Freed was there to document it.
Launch in player | Comments |
Apr 11, 2012 — Novelist Mary Gordon looks at love and maturity, while Henning Mankell delivers his last Kurt Wallander mystery. In nonfiction, Jim Rasenberger revisits the Bay of Pigs, Gayle Tzemach Lemmon tells of Afghani women's ingenuity, Charles Ogletree probes the arrest of Henry Louis Gates Jr., and Meagan O'Rourke meditates on her mother's death.
Comments |
Feb 24, 2012 — Science fiction's job is to give us a map of where we're headed. From Jules Verne to William Gibson, sci-fi authors describe their visions of the future, and how people might live in it. We ask Intel's futurist for his list of favorite sci-fi books.
Comments |
Sep 4, 2011 — Much of the NFL integrated in the 1940s. The Washington Redskins held out until 1962. In a new book, historian Thomas G. Smith writes about how it took an ultimatum from the Kennedy administration to allow blacks into pro football in the nation's capital.
Launch in player | Comments |
more Civil rights from NPR