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July 22, 2014 | NPR · Foreign ministers meeting Tuesday in Brussels are threatening deep sanctions against Russia over the Malaysia Airlines crash. But some nations might hesitate because of their economic ties to Russia.
 
July 22, 2014 | NPR · Renee Montagne talks to Anton La Guardia, who covers the European Union for The Economist, about the possibility of deep EU sanctions against Russia at Tuesday's foreign ministers meeting.
 
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July 22, 2014 | NPR · Florida Sen. Marco Rubio tells NPR the nation can't "absorb" all migrants fleeing violence and must secure its own border first. He dismissed potential 2016 rival Hillary Clinton as old news.
 

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July 22, 2014 | NPR · Two weeks into the conflict in the Gaza Strip, more than 600 Palestinians — mostly civilians — and 29 Israelis have been killed. Two recent Israeli strikes, on a school and a hospital, reflect the scope of Israel's offensive.
 
July 22, 2014 | NPR · U.S. airlines have canceled flights to Israel after reports of Hamas rockets landing near Ben Gurion International Airport outside Tel Aviv.
 
July 22, 2014 | NPR · Secretary of State John Kerry has finished his first full day in Cairo, where he's trying to help forge a cease-fire between Israel and Hamas in the Gaza Strip.
 

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July 19, 2014 | NPR · NPR's Scott Simon talks with David Herzsenhorn of The New York Times about the latest developments in Ukraine, where a Malaysia Airlines passenger plane was downed on Thursday, killing 298 people.
 

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July 20, 2014 | NPR · NPR's Arun Rath gets the latest from correspondent Corey Flintoff at the site of last week's downing of a Malaysian jetliner in Eastern Ukraine.
 

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Motion pictures

Oct 21, 2013 — In softcover fiction, Emma Donoghue imagines migrations and meanderings. In nonfiction, David Denby warns of film's descent into spectacle; Jake Tapper memorializes an ill-fated military outpost; Donald L. Barlett and James B. Steele examine the dwindling American middle class; and Caleb Daniloff puts on his running shoes to confront his demons.
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Apr 27, 2013 — April is National Poetry Month, and what better way to celebrate than with new books? This month brings us a reissue of Hayden, a retranslation of Dante, a gathering of estimable poems from the past quarter-century and a new collection with a camera-eye view of the world.
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Oct 18, 2012 — Film critic and historian David Thomson's new collection of essays covers a wide array of films, from Casablanca all the way to Alvin and the Chipmunks: The Squeakquel. Thomson digs through cinematic history to unearth truths about how what we watch reflects who we are.
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Sep 30, 2012 — In his new book, New Yorker film critic David Denby bemoans what digital and global filmmaking has done to the industry. "[Movies] have to play in Bangkok and Bangalore ... as well as Bangor, Maine," he says. "The local flavor has gone out of them."
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Aug 29, 2012 — Will Sloan says Leonard Maltin's annual movie guides may be brief and simple, but they've endured for a reason.
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Jul 17, 2011 — NPR coverage of Zeroville by Steve Erickson. News, author interviews, critics' picks and more.
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Jul 14, 2011 — NPR coverage of Designs on Film: A Century of Hollywood Art Direction by Cathy Whitlock and Art Directors Guild. News, author interviews, critics' picks and more.
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Jun 1, 2011 — Craving some cold-blooded thrills this summer? These detective novels offer twists and turns to help you beat the heat.
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Mar 29, 2011 — A memoir of living in close quarters with Susan Sontag; a novel set in the world of Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho; and a young-adult novel that covers the very adult themes of labor camps in 1941 Lithuania.
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Jan 27, 2011 — Once upon a time, scenery and special effects were crafted entirely by human hands. NPR's Susan Stamberg reveals some of the surprising secrets behind Gone with the Wind, The Wizard of Oz, Dr. Zhivago and other classics.
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