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August 21, 2014 | NPR · The attorney general hugged community leaders, a highway patrol captain and the mother of Michael Brown during his visit, and got an update on the federal investigation into the teen's shooting.
 
August 21, 2014 | NPR · At McCluer High School, 30 varsity football players — all black, mostly from Ferguson — practice. David Greene talks to Sports Illustrated writer Robert Klemko about his story, "Football in Ferguson."
 
August 21, 2014 | NPR · Kelly McEvers talks to Syria expert Shashank Joshi, about President Bashar al-Assad's tenacious grip on power. Joshi is with the Royal Services Institute in London.
 

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August 21, 2014 | NPR · The aftermath of the police shooting in Ferguson, Mo., has focused attention on police-involved killings more broadly in the U.S. But statistics on shootings by police are scarce. To learn why, Audie Cornish speaks with David Klinger, an associate professor at the University of Missouri in St. Louis.
 
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August 21, 2014 | NPR · The hunt is on to identify the man in the James Foley execution video who speaks with a British accent. An estimated 2,000 Europeans have left home to join the Islamic State in Syria and Iraq.
 
August 21, 2014 | NPR · An Israeli airstrike killed three Hamas military commanders, who were buried shortly later amid threats that the militant group would respond.
 

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August 16, 2014 | NPR · Both Ukraine and Russia say they're trying to send supplies to residents in eastern Ukraine. But with tensions on both sides running high, that aid may take a while to arrive.
 

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August 17, 2014 | NPR · American fighter jets and drones carried out airstrikes against Islamist targets near the Mosul Dam in northern Iraq on Saturday. A breach of the dam could threaten entire cities.
 

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16th century

Nov 12, 2013 — In softcover fiction, Katherine Marsh searches the heavens for a teenage dwarf's destiny and Juliann Garey approaches a bipolar life from three different angles. In softcover nonfiction, Jeff Speck paces the city streets and Ezekiel Emanuel reflects on the family life of three brothers with a few sharp angles of their own.
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Nov 13, 2012 — The world's first essayist, Michel Montaigne, was out riding one day when he got slammed from the rear, was thrown from his horse, crashed to the ground and for a brief time was, as he puts it, "dead." He described exactly what it felt like. Here's what he learned.
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Nov 10, 2012 — In her latest novel for young adults, Jepp Who Defied the Stars, author Katherine Marsh tells the coming-of-age story of a young royal court dwarf who decides to steal his fate back from the stars and instead write his own future.
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Sep 17, 2012 — In The Malice of Fortune, two of the biggest names of the Renaissance team up to track a killer. Michael Ennis pairs the ruthless political philosopher and the genius artist in a pulse-quickening, historical whodunit.
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Feb 20, 2012 — Hollywood is forever going back to the well of literature for ideas. Author Tessa Harris says, if it's books Hollywood wants, there are still plenty of gems out there waiting to be discovered. She points to three books that should be movies — and you can recommend others in the comments section.
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Nov 4, 2011French philosopher Michel de Montaigne's advice on How to Live debuts at No. 15.
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Jun 2, 2011 — When book critic Maureen Corrigan was a kid, her family would pile into the car for trips to sites of historical interest. For Corrigan, summer has always been the season for traveling back to a bygone age — either by hitting the road or hitting the books.
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Nov 22, 2010 — In 1962, 11-year-old Carlos Eire was one of thousands of children airlifted out of Cuba and sent to Florida to escape Fidel Castro's regime. His parents thought he'd return when Castro was deposed — but he never went home again. Eire recounts the experience in a new memoir.
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Sep 23, 2010 — Author Mary Sharratt recommends three titles that will take you back to the Italian Renaissance — an epoch of humanism and religious fervor, of philosophers and despots, of courtesans and saints. Pour yourself a glass of prosecco and experience the glory and danger of a lost age.
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Aug 2, 2009 — Sarah Dunant's latest book completes her trilogy of novels set in the Italian Renaissance. Sacred Hearts explores life in a 16th-century Benedictine convent.
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