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April 18, 2014 | NPR · The agreement calls on all parties to refrain from violence, requires that illegally-armed groups disarm and that control of government buildings be returned to Ukrainian authorities.
 
April 18, 2014 | NPR · President Obama said enrollment under the Affordable Care Act reached 8 million after the deadline was extended by 2 weeks. The figure represents a turnaround from the disastrous debut of the website.
 
April 18, 2014 | NPR · Morning Edition spent a lot of time recently reporting from the U.S.-Mexico border. President Obama has deported 2 million people from the U.S. But many say that number is misleading.
 

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April 18, 2014 | NPR · It looks as though the "comment period" for the controversial Keystone XL pipeline project will be extended, delaying a decision past the November elections.
 
April 18, 2014 | NPR · Regular political commentators, E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and David Brooks of The New York Times, discuss the breakthrough Ukraine deal and the new health care enrollment numbers.
 
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April 18, 2014 | NPR · Ivan Soltesz studies epilepsy in mice, but says children with chronic seizures are his inspiration. He's closing in on a way to quell the seizures with light — and without drugs' side effects.
 

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April 12, 2014 | NPR · As pro-Russia demonstrators continue their tense standoff in Eastern Ukraine, police are conspicuously absent from city streets.
 

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April 13, 2014 | NPR · As the anniversary of last year's marathon bombing approaches, NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with correspondent Carrie Johnson about the investigation and legal wrangling yet to come.
 

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John Grisham

Oct 18, 2013 — Grisham is returning to the world of his first novel, A Time to Kill, with a sequel called Sycamore Row. The book comes out at the same time as the stage adaptation of A Time to Kill opens on Broadway. NPR's Lynn Neary profiles Grisham, who says he loved writing the new book so much, he didn't want to hand it to the publisher.
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Nov 23, 2011 — Biographer Jane Leavy strips baseball hero Mickey Mantle of his glamour, while basketball coach Roy Williams looks back on his career, and filmmaker Sam Irvin celebrates the resilient gleam of performer and writer Kay Thompson. Also, C.J. Chivers explores the AK-47 and its impact on warfare.
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May 25, 2011 — Summer reading picks are on the way: the movie tie-in edition of David Nicholl's U.K. sensation One Day and the latest from John Grisham and Stephen King. In nonfiction, it's time to get superfreaky about economics, and comedian Jimmy Fallon offers a little thanks.
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Dec 15, 2010 — The topics of murder, theft and wartime made for some thrilling fiction this year. Critic Maureen Corrigan of Fresh Air picks the best mystery and suspense novels of 2010, in which the past comes back to haunt.
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Jun 4, 2010 — In Theodore Boone: Kid Lawyer, the best-selling author writes about a 13-year-old amateur attorney. Grisham says writing his first book for young readers was a challenge because he didn't want to talk down to his audience. He tells NPR's Michele Norris that kids are "a tougher crowd" than adults.
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Jan 27, 2008 — In his first legal thriller in three years, John Grisham explores a tainted Mississippi judicial system where Supreme Court justices are bought and sold. The Appeal serves as a cautionary tale about political corruption.
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Jan 15, 2008 — Alan Cheuse makes a prediction for forthcoming novels from John Grisham and Stephen King. Grisham's The Appeal centers on a $41 million jury award to a Mississippi woman whose family died at the hands of a chemical company; King's Duma Key features an evil genie who goes after a man in the Florida Keys.
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Oct 11, 2006 — John Grisham says he could never have come up with the story that's chronicled in his first work of nonfiction, The Innocent Man. It's the tragic tale of Ron Williamson, a small-town sports hero from Oklahoma wrongly convicted of murder.
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