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July 28, 2014 | NPR · Argentina says it cannot pay certain debts and will fall into default by July 31 if it can't come to an agreement with creditors. This would be Argentina's second default in 13 years.
 
July 28, 2014 | NPR · Even though Spain's economy is out of recession, youth unemployment has hit 57.7 percent. Economists say it could be years before jobs return. By then, many will have missed a decade or more of work.
 
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July 28, 2014 | NPR · To withstand their 9,300-mile migration, red knots feast on eggs from horseshoe crabs each spring in Delaware Bay. Scientists worry many crabs are starting to lay eggs before the birds can get there.
 

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July 28, 2014 | NPR · A new salvo has been fired in the fight over teacher tenure. A group led by former TV anchor Campbell Brown filed a complaint in New York state court, arguing that tenure laws are preventing the state from providing every child with the "sound, basic education" its constitution guarantees.
 
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July 28, 2014 | NPR · Why are so many low-income and minority kids getting second-class educations in the U.S.? That question is at the center of the heated debate about tenure protections and who gets them.
 
July 28, 2014 | NPR · Only one movie in July, Transformers: Age of Extinction, has broken the 100 million mark during its opening weekend. Box office receipts all summer have proven anemic. Paul Dergarabedian, a senior media analyst with RENTRAK, talks to Audie Cornish about the box office slump.
 

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July 26, 2014 | NPR · Hezbollah has been a longtime ally of Hamas, but during this most recent conflict between Israel and Gaza they've taken a sideline role. NPR's Scott Simon talks to the BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut.
 

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July 27, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Ukraine near the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 has international investigators staying away. NPR's Arun Rath talks with OSCE's Michael Bociurkiw about the investigation.
 

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Democracy

Jun 29, 2014 — Journalist Simon Denyer has been covering India's tumultuous political scene for most of the past decade. He tells NPR that Indian voters are tired of government corruption — but not of democracy.
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May 13, 2013 — In a new book, former U.S. Sen. Olympia Snowe explores how to fix the gridlock in Congress. Earlier this year, the Republican from Maine left the Senate out of frustration with the partisan stalemate. "It has to change, for the country," she says. "People deserve ... better representation."
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Sep 4, 2012 — In his new book, The Parties Versus the People, the former Republican congressman says party leaders have too much control over who runs for office, what bills make it to the floor and how lawmakers vote.
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May 10, 2012 — The former New Jersey senator, basketball player and presidential candidate sees an America enduring a "slow-motion crisis." But he also sees unlimited potential to improve the U.S. In We Can All Do Better, Bradley argues that political change can come about remarkably fast, but only if people get involved.
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May 23, 2011 — From 2007 to 2010, PBS's Bill Moyers Journal drew a loyal audience to its coverage of politics, public controversy and the arts. Now, in a new book, longtime host Bill Moyers shares memorable interviews from his third PBS show.
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Mar 31, 2011 — Roddy Doyle's new novel confronts the dream and reality of Ireland, while Hampton Sides examines Martin Luther King's assassination, historian Tony Judt critiques our deteriorating social contract, and Barbara Stauch defends the middle-aged brain.
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Nov 11, 2010 — Although she says she doesn't "believe in politics," Maira Kalman went on a yearlong adventure to paint and write the story of American democracy. Out of it came the graphic novel And the Pursuit of Happiness. Along the way, Kalman says, she became smitten with Ruth Bader Ginsberg, intimidated by Thomas Jefferson, and she fell in love with Abe Lincoln. And she gained a great respect for American democracy.
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Nov 2, 2010 — Whimsical and richly illustrated, Maira Kalman's graphic diary is an optimistic yearlong exploration of American history and government. And the Pursuit of Happiness is an unorthodox tribute to the United States — from musings on the Department of Homeland Security to Ruth Bader Ginsburg to Ben Franklin.
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Mar 29, 2010 — In 2008, historian Tony Judt was diagnosed with ALS, a progressive motor-neuron disease. For the past several months, Judt has been writing a series of essays for The New York Review of Books, charting life in what he calls a "progressive imprisonment without parole."
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Jan 4, 2010 — Raj Patel, author of The Value of Nothing, would like people to think more about the cost of items they buy — not just the price set by the market but the environmental and social costs, too. He says market prices let people avoid paying the true costs of things.
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