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April 24, 2014 | NPR · Hundreds of civilians have been massacred in the South Sudan town of Bentiu. For more, Steve Inskeep talks to Andrew Green, the South Sudan bureau chief for the Voice of America.
 
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April 24, 2014 | NPR · One year ago, a factory building in Bangladesh collapsed, killing more than 1,100 workers. Top retailers have begun inspecting factories more aggressively, but other steps have fallen short.
 
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April 24, 2014 | NPR · Some of the factors keeping low-income students from getting into college aren't always obvious to the public, higher education insiders tell Morning Edition's David Greene.
 

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April 21, 2014 | NPR · Last year a scientist said he'd found a new form of botulinum toxin, and was keeping details secret to keep the recipe from terrorists. But other science and public health labs were shut out, too.
 
April 23, 2014 | NPR · Pharmaceutical companies are suddenly trading entire divisions the way sports teams swap players. Glaxo, Novartis and Ely Lily are all involved in a complicated deal announced Tuesday, and so far this year, five deals exceeding $2 billion have been announced. What's driving the deal-making?
 
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April 23, 2014 | NPR · For decades, a mysterious quacking "bio-duck" has been heard roaming the waters of the Southern Ocean. Now scientists say the source is a whale.
 

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April 19, 2014 | NPR · The search continues for hundreds of people, mostly students, who were on board a South Korean ferry when it sank this week. Correspondent Anthony Kuhn shares the latest with NPR's Wade Goodwyn.
 

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April 20, 2014 | NPR · Monday is the 2014 Boston Marathon. Security will be tight, and this year's race will be an emotional event that will be about more than who wins.
 

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Democracy

May 13, 2013 — In a new book, former U.S. Sen. Olympia Snowe explores how to fix the gridlock in Congress. Earlier this year, the Republican from Maine left the Senate out of frustration with the partisan stalemate. "It has to change, for the country," she says. "People deserve ... better representation."
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Sep 4, 2012 — In his new book, The Parties Versus the People, the former Republican congressman says party leaders have too much control over who runs for office, what bills make it to the floor and how lawmakers vote.
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May 10, 2012 — The former New Jersey senator, basketball player and presidential candidate sees an America enduring a "slow-motion crisis." But he also sees unlimited potential to improve the U.S. In We Can All Do Better, Bradley argues that political change can come about remarkably fast, but only if people get involved.
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May 23, 2011 — From 2007 to 2010, PBS's Bill Moyers Journal drew a loyal audience to its coverage of politics, public controversy and the arts. Now, in a new book, longtime host Bill Moyers shares memorable interviews from his third PBS show.
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Mar 31, 2011 — Roddy Doyle's new novel confronts the dream and reality of Ireland, while Hampton Sides examines Martin Luther King's assassination, historian Tony Judt critiques our deteriorating social contract, and Barbara Stauch defends the middle-aged brain.
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Nov 11, 2010 — Although she says she doesn't "believe in politics," Maira Kalman went on a yearlong adventure to paint and write the story of American democracy. Out of it came the graphic novel And the Pursuit of Happiness. Along the way, Kalman says, she became smitten with Ruth Bader Ginsberg, intimidated by Thomas Jefferson, and she fell in love with Abe Lincoln. And she gained a great respect for American democracy.
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Nov 2, 2010 — Whimsical and richly illustrated, Maira Kalman's graphic diary is an optimistic yearlong exploration of American history and government. And the Pursuit of Happiness is an unorthodox tribute to the United States — from musings on the Department of Homeland Security to Ruth Bader Ginsburg to Ben Franklin.
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Mar 29, 2010 — In 2008, historian Tony Judt was diagnosed with ALS, a progressive motor-neuron disease. For the past several months, Judt has been writing a series of essays for The New York Review of Books, charting life in what he calls a "progressive imprisonment without parole."
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Jan 4, 2010 — Raj Patel, author of The Value of Nothing, would like people to think more about the cost of items they buy — not just the price set by the market but the environmental and social costs, too. He says market prices let people avoid paying the true costs of things.
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Feb 12, 2008 — Benazir Bhutto made the last few edits on Reconciliation, her final book, on the morning that she was assassinated. In that book — part political manifesto, part memoir — Bhutto wrote that she was prepared for the worst upon her return to Pakistan from exile.
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