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August 19, 2014 | NPR · More than one week after the shooting death of an unarmed black teenager in a St. Louis suburb, protests continue. On Monday night, police fired tear gas and stun grenades to disperse demonstrators.
 
August 19, 2014 | NPR · The actions in Ferguson, Mo., have inspired talk about the militarization of U.S. police departments. The real question, is whether police have become militarized in their attitude toward the public.
 
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August 19, 2014 | KHN · Across the U.S., jails hold many more people with serious mental illness than state hospitals do. San Antonio is reweaving its safety net for the mentally ill — and saving $10 million annually.
 

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August 19, 2014 | NPR · Dr. Joanne Liu of Doctors Without Borders says fear and a lack of sense of urgency has kept the international community in their home countries rather than stepping up to the plate in West Africa.
 
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August 19, 2014 | NPR · The type of Ebola erupting in West Africa is closely related to one found 2,500 miles away — the distance between Boston and San Francisco. How did the virus spread so far without anyone noticing?
 
August 19, 2014 | NPR · Iranian poet and women's rights advocate Simin Behbahani has died. Her work probed the social and political challenges that faced Iran after its Islamic Revolution. She was 87.
 

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August 16, 2014 | NPR · Both Ukraine and Russia say they're trying to send supplies to residents in eastern Ukraine. But with tensions on both sides running high, that aid may take a while to arrive.
 

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August 17, 2014 | NPR · American fighter jets and drones carried out airstrikes against Islamist targets near the Mosul Dam in northern Iraq on Saturday. A breach of the dam could threaten entire cities.
 

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Democracy

Jun 29, 2014 — Journalist Simon Denyer has been covering India's tumultuous political scene for most of the past decade. He tells NPR that Indian voters are tired of government corruption — but not of democracy.
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May 13, 2013 — In a new book, former U.S. Sen. Olympia Snowe explores how to fix the gridlock in Congress. Earlier this year, the Republican from Maine left the Senate out of frustration with the partisan stalemate. "It has to change, for the country," she says. "People deserve ... better representation."
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Sep 4, 2012 — In his new book, The Parties Versus the People, the former Republican congressman says party leaders have too much control over who runs for office, what bills make it to the floor and how lawmakers vote.
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May 10, 2012 — The former New Jersey senator, basketball player and presidential candidate sees an America enduring a "slow-motion crisis." But he also sees unlimited potential to improve the U.S. In We Can All Do Better, Bradley argues that political change can come about remarkably fast, but only if people get involved.
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May 23, 2011 — From 2007 to 2010, PBS's Bill Moyers Journal drew a loyal audience to its coverage of politics, public controversy and the arts. Now, in a new book, longtime host Bill Moyers shares memorable interviews from his third PBS show.
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Mar 31, 2011 — Roddy Doyle's new novel confronts the dream and reality of Ireland, while Hampton Sides examines Martin Luther King's assassination, historian Tony Judt critiques our deteriorating social contract, and Barbara Stauch defends the middle-aged brain.
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Nov 11, 2010 — Although she says she doesn't "believe in politics," Maira Kalman went on a yearlong adventure to paint and write the story of American democracy. Out of it came the graphic novel And the Pursuit of Happiness. Along the way, Kalman says, she became smitten with Ruth Bader Ginsberg, intimidated by Thomas Jefferson, and she fell in love with Abe Lincoln. And she gained a great respect for American democracy.
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Nov 2, 2010 — Whimsical and richly illustrated, Maira Kalman's graphic diary is an optimistic yearlong exploration of American history and government. And the Pursuit of Happiness is an unorthodox tribute to the United States — from musings on the Department of Homeland Security to Ruth Bader Ginsburg to Ben Franklin.
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Mar 29, 2010 — In 2008, historian Tony Judt was diagnosed with ALS, a progressive motor-neuron disease. For the past several months, Judt has been writing a series of essays for The New York Review of Books, charting life in what he calls a "progressive imprisonment without parole."
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Jan 4, 2010 — Raj Patel, author of The Value of Nothing, would like people to think more about the cost of items they buy — not just the price set by the market but the environmental and social costs, too. He says market prices let people avoid paying the true costs of things.
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