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July 11, 2014 | NPR · President Obama has asked for $3.7 billion to deal with the southern border crisis. There are predictions the number of unaccompanied children entering the U.S. could reach 90,000 by October.
 
July 11, 2014 | NPR · Mara Liasson, Carrie Kahn and John Burnett discuss the big picture of the current immigration debate, and update us on the latest developments.
 
July 11, 2014 | NPR · Steve Inskeep talks to Ali Khedery, who used to support Nouri al-Maliki. Khedery, head of the Dubai-based Dragoman Partners, thinks al-Maliki should step down because of the extremist crisis in Iraq.
 

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July 11, 2014 | NPR · While House Republicans move ahead with their lawsuit alleging executive branch overreach, Obama is using the challenge to score political points of his own.
 
July 11, 2014 | NPR · Regular political commentators, E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and David Brooks of The New York Times, discuss the conflict in the Gaza Strip and President Obama's request of emergency immigration funds.
 
July 11, 2014 | NPR · Germany thrashed Brazil 7-1 this week. Author Kevin Roose says Ernest Thayer's classic poem on failure, "Casey at the Bat," might cheer the Brazilian soccer team up.
 

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July 5, 2014 | NPR · In the year since Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi was ousted, a military man was elected president and a budding insurgency has grown, as correspondent Leila Fadel tells NPR's Tamara Keith.
 

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July 6, 2014 | NPR · Tensions are high following the murder of three young Israelis and a Palestinian teen. Relatives of the murdered Palestinian say his American cousin was beaten by Israeli police during a protest.
 

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Social conditions

Jun 17, 2014 — If books float your boat, we've got just the thing: magical barge battles, the search for the Northwest Passage and a trans-Atlantic cruise that follows in Geoffrey Chaucer's footsteps. Also pirates!
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Jun 13, 2014 — In One Summer, Bill Bryson looks at historical events — featuring the likes of Charles Lindbergh and Babe Ruth — from the summer of 1927. It appears at No. 10.
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Mar 28, 2014 — In a his book, historian Bruce Levine says that from the destruction of the South emerged an entirely new country, making the Civil War equivalent to a second American Revolution.
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Mar 14, 2014 — In The Unwinding, appearing at No. 12, George Packer profiles both ordinary and famous Americans.
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Feb 7, 2014 — Charlie LeDuff examines the slow decline of a once rich city in Detroit, which appears at No. 11.
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Jan 20, 2014 — In softcover nonfiction, mother-of-three Kelly Oxford wisecracks, Errol Morris reexamines the Jeffrey MacDonald murder case and Shereen El Feki travels across the Arab world asking people about their sexuality.
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Jan 13, 2014 — Organizers of the Winter Games are preparing to serve up quite a bit of the hearty, deep-red Russian soup. Which is kind of ironic, says Russian food writer Anya von Bremzen, since borscht carries with it complicated political implications. And not all borschts are created equal, she warns.
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Jan 3, 2014 — In One Summer, at No. 5, Bill Bryson tells the true story of a few fascinating months of 1927.
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Dec 28, 2013 — Miss Havisham is one of Charles Dickens' most enduring characters. She appears in Great Expectations as an eccentric recluse, jilted at the altar years ago, who still wears her wedding gown and presides over a rotting feast. In his new novel, Ronald Frame imagines the kind of life that would have created such a woman.
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Dec 14, 2013 — In a recent ruling, the Indian Supreme Court reinstated a colonial-era ban on gay sex. Two authors react to the news with two very different recommendations. Manil Suri suggests that readers check out a book of interviews, while Ruth Franklin turns to Victorian England for a look at a similar law's effects.
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