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July 31, 2014 | NPR · Tens of thousands of displaced Gazans face skyrocketing prices for limited water supplies, and severely disrupted electricity service. As well, long lines are developing for staples like bread.
 
July 31, 2014 | NPR · Christian Science Monitor reporter Christa Case Bryant tells Renee Montagne why the Israeli army is finding Hamas a more formidable foe now than during the 2009 war.
 
July 31, 2014 | NPR · Oklahoma is experiencing more earthquakes, and some scientists say they're caused by wastewater disposal wells. Linda Wertheimer learns more from energy reporter Joe Wertz of StateImpact Oklahoma.
 

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July 31, 2014 | NPR · Israel's military has called up 16,000 more reservists, stoking fears of a widening offensive in Gaza. Aid workers are warning of a growing humanitarian crisis in the region, including a significant displaced population and a potential shortage of drinking water.
 
July 31, 2014 | NPR · Nearly a month into the war in Gaza, pollsters have been taking a look at how attitudes in the region have changed among Israelis and Palestinians.
 
July 31, 2014 | NPR · A surge of new cases in West Africa's Ebola virus outbreak has health officials worried that the epidemic is getting worse. Sierra Leone, for one, has declared a state of emergency, sending in troops to quarantine some of the hardest hit communities.
 

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July 26, 2014 | NPR · Hezbollah has been a longtime ally of Hamas, but during this most recent conflict between Israel and Gaza they've taken a sideline role. NPR's Scott Simon talks to the BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut.
 

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July 27, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Ukraine near the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 has international investigators staying away. NPR's Arun Rath talks with OSCE's Michael Bociurkiw about the investigation.
 

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Social conditions

Jul 28, 2014 — The transition from one part of the world to another is filled with anticipation, conflict and drama. These trips can herald life-changing transformations for families seeking out better lives.
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Jun 17, 2014 — If books float your boat, we've got just the thing: magical barge battles, the search for the Northwest Passage and a trans-Atlantic cruise that follows in Geoffrey Chaucer's footsteps. Also pirates!
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Jun 13, 2014 — In One Summer, Bill Bryson looks at historical events — featuring the likes of Charles Lindbergh and Babe Ruth — from the summer of 1927. It appears at No. 10.
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Mar 28, 2014 — In a his book, historian Bruce Levine says that from the destruction of the South emerged an entirely new country, making the Civil War equivalent to a second American Revolution.
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Mar 14, 2014 — In The Unwinding, appearing at No. 12, George Packer profiles both ordinary and famous Americans.
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Feb 7, 2014 — Charlie LeDuff examines the slow decline of a once rich city in Detroit, which appears at No. 11.
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Jan 20, 2014 — In softcover nonfiction, mother-of-three Kelly Oxford wisecracks, Errol Morris reexamines the Jeffrey MacDonald murder case and Shereen El Feki travels across the Arab world asking people about their sexuality.
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Jan 13, 2014 — Organizers of the Winter Games are preparing to serve up quite a bit of the hearty, deep-red Russian soup. Which is kind of ironic, says Russian food writer Anya von Bremzen, since borscht carries with it complicated political implications. And not all borschts are created equal, she warns.
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Jan 3, 2014 — In One Summer, at No. 5, Bill Bryson tells the true story of a few fascinating months of 1927.
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Dec 28, 2013 — Miss Havisham is one of Charles Dickens' most enduring characters. She appears in Great Expectations as an eccentric recluse, jilted at the altar years ago, who still wears her wedding gown and presides over a rotting feast. In his new novel, Ronald Frame imagines the kind of life that would have created such a woman.
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