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August 28, 2014 | NPR · James Tomsheck was pushed out of his job as internal affairs chief for Customs and Border Protection in June. He warns the agency has become a paramilitary organization with little accountability.
 
August 28, 2014 | NPR · U.S. and Russian experts recently met on neutral territory, on an island in Finland, to try to work through issues that have been building up ever since Vladimir Putin returned to the Kremlin.
 
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August 28, 2014 | NPR · Foster Farms has been accused of poisoning its customers with salmonella bacteria. But in recent months, the company has become a leader in the poultry industry's fight against the foodborne pathogen.
 

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August 27, 2014 | NPR · The end of August heralds the start to the final phase of the 2014 election season. As primaries wrap up and candidates ready themselves for November, NPR's Charlie Mahtesian lays out the political landscape.
 
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August 27, 2014 | NPR · Across the nation, state legislators are gearing up for Election Day. And they're well aware that their fates could be tied to national political forces like the president's low approval rating.
 
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August 27, 2014 | NPR · Irn Bru is a neon orange soda that inspires passion and may help explain the strong independent streak in Scotland as it prepares to vote Sept. 18 on whether to break away from the United Kingdom.
 

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August 23, 2014 | NPR · Nearly 1,500 people have died in the Ebola outbreak, and more nations in the region are closing their borders. NPR's Scott Simon speaks to Africa correspondent Ofeibea Quist-Arcton about the epidemic.
 

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August 24, 2014 | NPR · In the wake of violent clashes between protesters and police in Ferguson, Mo., President Obama is ordering a review of the federal programs that help local police departments purchase military gear.
 

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Civilization, Modern

Jun 18, 2013 — Is it really possible that the civilizations that grew up in the "other" hemisphere have nothing useful to say about value, the categories of experience or the nature of mind? No. Luckily, we may be on the cusp of a new global era for philosophy.
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Jan 11, 2013 — At No. 3, Stephen Greenblatt's The Swerve explains how Roman philosophy lead to the Renaissance.
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Sep 14, 2012The Swerve explores how a Roman philosopher helped jump-start the Renaissance. It debuts at No. 3.
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Dec 14, 2011 — 2011 was a terrific year for fiction — both from first-time novelists and much-decorated veterans. Maureen Corrigan's recommendations range from Karen Russell's dazzling debut, to David Foster Wallace's posthumously published novel, to what may be the Sept. 11 novel.
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Nov 17, 2011 — In a celebratory National Book Awards on Wall Street last night, Stephen Greenblatt took the nonfiction award for Swerve, while, in a surprise turn in fiction, Jesmyn Ward won for Salvage the Bones.
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Sep 20, 2011 — Stephen Greenblatt chronicles the unlikely discovery of Lucretius' poem "On the Nature of Things" — by a 15th-century Italian book hunter. The Swerve is a masterfully written meditation on the fragile inheritance of ideas.
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Sep 19, 2011 — In his new book, author and Harvard literature professor Stephen Greenblatt explores the 2,000 year-old writings of Lucretius and his "spookily modern" creation tale.
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May 23, 2011 — From 2007 to 2010, PBS's Bill Moyers Journal drew a loyal audience to its coverage of politics, public controversy and the arts. Now, in a new book, longtime host Bill Moyers shares memorable interviews from his third PBS show.
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Mar 31, 2011 — Roddy Doyle's new novel confronts the dream and reality of Ireland, while Hampton Sides examines Martin Luther King's assassination, historian Tony Judt critiques our deteriorating social contract, and Barbara Stauch defends the middle-aged brain.
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Sep 22, 2010 — Music infuses veteran novelist Kazuo Ishiguro's first collection of short stories and award-winning author Connie Willis views London's Blitz during WWII from the distant future while Alain de Botton watches the world pass by at Heathrow Airport — and more.
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