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April 18, 2014 | NPR · The agreement calls on all parties to refrain from violence, requires that illegally-armed groups disarm and that control of government buildings be returned to Ukrainian authorities.
 
April 18, 2014 | NPR · President Obama said enrollment under the Affordable Care Act reached 8 million after the deadline was extended by 2 weeks. The figure represents a turnaround from the disastrous debut of the website.
 
April 18, 2014 | NPR · Morning Edition spent a lot of time recently reporting from the U.S.-Mexico border. President Obama has deported 2 million people from the U.S. But many say that number is misleading.
 

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April 19, 2014 | NPR · The military's training center at Fort Irwin in California is complete with mock Middle Eastern villages. But as the U.S. combat mission in Afghanistan winds down, how will this facility change?
 
April 19, 2014 | NPR · In the Ukrainian city of Donetsk, the opposing camps seem increasingly entrenched, despite a diplomatic effort to ease tensions. Pro-Russian forces refuse to leave occupied buildings and public squares in the east. It's an uneasy Easter weekend and neither side is willing to budge.
 
April 19, 2014 | NPR · Russia is in the middle of a planned upgrade and expansion of its military forces, but global affairs professor Mark Galeotti tells NPR's Arun Rath that Russia's military has its limits.
 

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April 19, 2014 | NPR · The search continues for hundreds of people, mostly students, who were on board a South Korean ferry when it sank this week. Correspondent Anthony Kuhn shares the latest with NPR's Wade Goodwyn.
 

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April 13, 2014 | NPR · As the anniversary of last year's marathon bombing approaches, NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with correspondent Carrie Johnson about the investigation and legal wrangling yet to come.
 

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Group identity

Mar 28, 2013 — The American South as a region has been defined by change since the Civil War. Twenty years after she left the South, Georgia native Tracy Thompson went on a four-year journey to explore what it means to be Southern in the 21st century. In The New Mind of the South, she shares her discoveries.
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May 21, 2011 — If there wasn't a spot for you at the cool table in the cafeteria, fear not: In her new book, The Geeks Shall Inherit the Earth, Alexandra Robbins argues that the teen losers of today are the adult success stories of tomorrow.
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Dec 1, 2010 — "You can no longer talk about what black America thinks or feels," says Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist Eugene Robinson. His new book, Disintegration: The Splintering of Black America, describes how African-American communities are becoming increasingly disconnected from one another.
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Oct 5, 2010 — Historically black neighborhoods were known for bringing people of different economic classes together — but that all changed during the civil rights movement. Eugene Robinson writes about how post-civil rights social mobility tore black communities apart in Disintegration.
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Apr 12, 2010 — Women taking a math test will perform worse when reminded that women aren't expected to do well in math. Social psychologist Claude Steele calls this an example of the "stereotype threat." In his book, Whistling Vivaldi, he lays out a plan to reshape those expectations.
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Apr 23, 2009 — A new Census Bureau report shows that fewer Americans are relocating now than at any time in the past six decades. If you're interested in moving to a new home, but cannot because of the bad economy, tell us your story.
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Oct 22, 2008 — Why do pigs oink in English and chrjo in Russian? What does the word ma ma have to do with the word mammal? In his new book, Alphabet Juice, humorist and author Roy Blount Jr. traces the origins of everyday words and how they have changed over time.
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Sep 30, 2008 — Bill Bishop, author of The Big Sort, argues that Americans are segregating themselves into ideologically-homogeneous communities. The majority of Americans are so comfortable in their beliefs, says Bishop, that they can't even listen to opposing viewpoints.
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May 10, 2007 — Humorist and writer Roy Blount Jr. has spent years exploring the rocky relationship and stereotypes between the North and the South. His latest book is a collection of witty and sly observations as a Southern white guy "living pigeon-holed" up North.
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Apr 18, 2006 — Farai Chideya discusses high-profile cases involving so-called "black protectionism" — people of color sticking by African-American politicians or celebrities, despite allegations of wrongdoing. She talks to criminology law professor Katheryn Russell-Brown, author of Protecting Our Own: Race, Crime and African Americans.
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