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July 23, 2014 | NPR · A number of major airlines have suspended service to and from Tel Aviv as the fighting between Israel and Hamas in Gaza intensifies. That's leaving passengers to find other arrangements.
 
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July 23, 2014 | NPR · The vice president has been traveling the country to learn about the best ways to train workers. He announced the results Tuesday as the president signed a workforce training bill into law.
 
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July 23, 2014 | NPR · Congress is supposed to hold U.S. spy agencies accountable. But as Edward Snowden's disclosures revealed, intelligence officials have not always provided a full or accurate picture.
 

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July 23, 2014 | NPR · The remains of passengers of the downed Malaysia Airlines flight arrived in the Netherlands, on what has been a national day of mourning. Most of those killed in the jet that was brought down over Ukraine were Dutch. Robert Siegel talks with Thomas Erdbrink of The New York Times, who is in the Netherlands.
 
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July 23, 2014 | NPR · Even before the double calamity of its two downed flights, Malaysia Airlines was trying to adapt to momentous shifts in Asia's aviation industry. Now, it faces either bankruptcy or privatization.
 
July 23, 2014 | NPR · An uncontacted Amazonian tribe has ended its isolation in Brazil. Fiona Watson, the field and research director for Survival International, explains why this tribal people left its village.
 

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July 19, 2014 | NPR · NPR's Scott Simon talks with David Herzsenhorn of The New York Times about the latest developments in Ukraine, where a Malaysia Airlines passenger plane was downed on Thursday, killing 298 people.
 

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July 20, 2014 | NPR · NPR's Arun Rath gets the latest from correspondent Corey Flintoff at the site of last week's downing of a Malaysian jetliner in Eastern Ukraine.
 

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Financial crises

Oct 18, 2013 — Alan Greenspan was often celebrated during his long chairmanship of the Federal Reserve. But Greenspan's policies have been blamed by some for the Great Recession. In an interview with NPR about his new book, The Map and the Territory: Risk, Human Nature, and the Future of Forecasting, Greenspan discusses difficulties in predicting economic calamity.
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May 28, 2013 — In softcover fiction, Deborah Harkness sends a witch and a vampire back to Elizabethan England, and John Lanchester looks at London circa 2008. In nonfiction, Sally Koslow explores parenting adult children, and Andrew Blum reveals the infrastructure behind the Internet.
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Apr 8, 2013 — In a new book, Washington Post economics writer Neil Irwin looks at an elite group of policymakers from around the world who manage the money supply, and explains how money can come from — and disappear into — thin air based on the decisions of these influential men and women.
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Apr 3, 2013 — In 2006, two Manhattan housing projects were at the center of a real estate fiasco that would come to epitomize the housing crisis. Charles Bagli's Other People's Money explains how the government of Singapore was among those who paid for the mistakes of New York's real estate giants.
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Mar 15, 2013 — Anat Admati, finance professor at Stanford and co-author of a new book on American banks, argues that banks carry too much debt and have too little equity. Government support allows them to hide their risky behavior, distorting the economy as a whole, she says.
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Feb 5, 2013 — In fiction, a novel from Nobel Prize-winner Nadine Gordimer, a posthumous thriller from Michael Crichton and a sensual werewolf tale from Anne Rice arrive in paperback. In softcover nonfiction, Paul Krugman confronts our economic depression, and Charles Murray looks at the U.S. class divide.
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Sep 26, 2012 — Condoleezza Rice remembers her time in the Bush administration, Michael Lewis and Thant Myint-U discuss the world's economies, Michael Moore recounts his journey toward becoming a filmmaker, and Toni Morrison collects essays about censorship and the power of literature.
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Sep 21, 2012 — At No. 4, Michael Lewis' Boomerang examines the international fallout of the cheap credit bubble.
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Jun 20, 2012 — Michael Ondaatje returns with a seafaring coming-of-age story, while Lev Grossman delivers another literary fantasy and Ernest Cline makes his nerdy fiction debut. Journalist Ron Suskind casts Obama as a brilliant amateur and Amanda Foreman looks at Britain's role in the Civil War.
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Jun 8, 2012 — In the 2008 financial crash, a lot was written in newspapers and even books — but there wasn't much fiction out there to help those who like to view life through an imaginative lens. Now author John Lanchester's Capital can fill that void. It describes the crash as seen from London, and Lizzie Skurnick calls it "brilliant."
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