Latest News from NPR

on:

NCPR is supported by:

 
Hourly Newscast
4 min., 45 sec.

Programs

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Latest Features:
AP
April 17, 2014 | NPR · Scientists and food activists are launching a campaign to promote seeds that can be freely shared, rather than protected through patents and licenses. They call it the Open Source Seed Initiative.
 
AP
April 17, 2014 | NPR · A typical UPS truck now has hundreds of sensors on it. That's changing the way UPS drivers work — and it foreshadows changes coming for workers throughout the economy.
 
April 17, 2014 | NPR · Brazil is the spiritual home of soccer and a world powerhouse in the sport. It's woven into the Brazilian psyche. Wins and losses have had repercussions in other realms — including politics.
 

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Latest Features:
April 17, 2014 | NPR · President Obama met Thursday with insurance company executives and a separate group of insurance regulators from the states, discussing their mutual interest in administering the new health care law.
 
Getty Images
April 17, 2014 | NPR · The president has visited Prince George's County, Md., four times this year. It is the most affluent county with an African-American majority. It also happens to be very close to the White House.
 
NASA/SETI Institute/JPL-Caltech
April 17, 2014 | NPR · Kepler-186f is almost the same size as Earth, and it orbits in its star's "Goldilocks zone"-- where temperatures may be just right for life. But much is unknown because it's also 500 light-years away.
 

Latest Saturday rundown




WE Saturday Feature

AP
April 12, 2014 | NPR · As pro-Russia demonstrators continue their tense standoff in Eastern Ukraine, police are conspicuously absent from city streets.
 

Latest Sunday rundown


WE Sunday Feature

April 13, 2014 | NPR · As the anniversary of last year's marathon bombing approaches, NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with correspondent Carrie Johnson about the investigation and legal wrangling yet to come.
 

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

SCIENCE / Life Sciences / Biology / General

Oct 22, 2012 — By some counts of human history, the number of humans on Earth may have skidded so sharply that we were down to just 1,000 reproductive adults. And a supervolcano might have been to blame.
Comments |
Sep 28, 2012 — When William Buckland was a kid, an undergraduate at Oxford in the late 1790s, he pulled a prank that was so rude, so smart, and so biologically sophisticated for his day, he deserves a crown for The Best Use of Grass Ever.
Comments |
Aug 24, 2012 — Neuroscientist David Eagleman says everything we think, do and believe is determined by complex neural networks battling it out in our brains. His book Incognito, in which he explains what scientists are learning about this hidden world of cognition, is now out in paperback.
Launch in player | Comments |
Jul 23, 2012 — In The Violinist's Thumb, writer Sam Kean goes inside our genetic code, looking at the stories written by the fundamental building blocks within us. The book explains things like why some people can't handle drinking coffee and why some human babies are born with tails.
Launch in player | Comments |
Jul 18, 2012 — Tsutomu Yamaguchi was late for work in August 1945, in Hiroshima, Japan, when he saw an airplane drop a silvery speck into the air. He survived the bombing only to make his way to Nagasaki three days later...just as that city was bombed, too.
Comments |
Jul 17, 2012 — Sam Kean's The Violinist's Thumb: And Other Lost Tales of Love, War, and Genius, as Written by Our Genetic Code delves into the history of genetics, in the anecdotal and engaging mode of his previous exploration of the periodic table, The Disappearing Spoon.
Comments |
Jun 7, 2012 — Julian Barnes returns with a Booker Prize-winning novel while Michael Parker wins big praise for his historical story set in North Carolina. In nonfiction, there are memoirs by writer Joan Didion and boxer Sugar Ray Leonard, plus David M. Eagleman looks into the secret life of the brain.
Comments |
May 24, 2012 — Critic Michael Schaub offers a sneak peek at some of the most hotly anticipated books of the summer: An Obama bio. A sparkling debut. Thrillers of both the fictional and body-science kind. Even Lincoln is reborn in this season of sun, sand, renewal — and reading.
Comments |
Jul 14, 2011 — NPR coverage of Annoying: The Science of What Bugs Us by Joe Palca and Flora Lichtman. News, author interviews, critics' picks and more.
Comments |
Jul 14, 2011 — NPR coverage of Incognito: The Secret Lives of the Brain by David M. Eagleman. News, author interviews, critics' picks and more.
Comments |
more SCIENCE / Life Sciences / Biology / General from NPR