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August 20, 2014 | NPR · If you venture away from the protest zone in Ferguson, Mo., there is an idyllic neighborhood, which doesn't have much patience for the out-of-towners who have joined the protests.
 
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August 20, 2014 | NPR · President Obama has carefully avoided taking sides following the shooting of Missouri teen Michael Brown, disappointing some African-American observers.
 
August 20, 2014 | NPR · Texas ranks 49th out of 50 states in how much funding it commits to mental health. But San Antonio has become a model for other mental health systems. It has saved $50 million over the past 5 years.
 

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August 20, 2014 | NPR · Demonstrators want an indictment of the police officer who fatally shot Michael Brown earlier this month. But investigations — one of them a federal civil rights case — can take weeks, if not months.
 
August 20, 2014 | NPR · More than a week now from the police shooting in Ferguson, Mo., it's worth asking: Ideally, what should happen with a police officer stops someone in the street?
 
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August 20, 2014 | NPR · Enlisting has been a rite of passage for men in the Pierce family since the Civil War. And as America has changed, Mark Pierce and his son Jeremy explain, what it means to serve has, too.
 

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August 16, 2014 | NPR · Both Ukraine and Russia say they're trying to send supplies to residents in eastern Ukraine. But with tensions on both sides running high, that aid may take a while to arrive.
 

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August 17, 2014 | NPR · American fighter jets and drones carried out airstrikes against Islamist targets near the Mosul Dam in northern Iraq on Saturday. A breach of the dam could threaten entire cities.
 

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Human experimentation in medicine

Jun 27, 2013 — Book reviewer Alan Cheuse picks five exciting summer reads, ranging from short stories of grim Irish mayhem to a North Carolina lynching and a corpse in an iceberg, to Southern California cocaine capers and a pure-trash adventure starring U.S. special forces and a world-threatening comet.
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Feb 18, 2013 — It was one of the most revolutionary tools of biomedical research: the immortal HeLa cell line. But few people know the cells belonged to a poor Southern tobacco farmer named Henrietta Lacks. Rebecca Skloot spent years researching Lacks and tells her story in The Immortal Life Of Henrietta Lacks.
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Oct 26, 2012 — Justin Cronin's tale of a world run over by vampires continues with The Twelve. It debuts at No. 3.
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Jul 13, 2012 — Rebecca Skloot's study of the life behind the HeLa cell is on the list for a 70th week.
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Aug 25, 2011 — Many colleges assign books that all incoming freshmen must read over the summer. A popular 2011 assignment is The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot, about a cell line taken without consent from a black woman with cervical cancer.
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Jul 17, 2011 — NPR coverage of The Unit by Ninni Holmqvist and Marlaine Delargy. News, author interviews, critics' picks and more.
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Jul 14, 2011 — NPR coverage of The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot. News, author interviews, critics' picks and more.
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May 18, 2011 — Much talked-about novels arrive this week: Emma Donoghue's Room, about a captive mother and child, Justin Cronin's apocalyptic vampire novel The Passage, and Brady Udall's The Lonely Polygamist. In nonfiction, there's Sebastian Junger's War in Afghanistan, and Robert McCrum explains how English become the world's common tongue.
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Mar 18, 2011 — In 1951, Henrietta Lacks died after a long battle with cervical cancer. Doctors cultured her cells without permission from her family. The story of those cells and of the medical advances that came from them, is told in Rebecca Skloot's book, The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks.
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Mar 9, 2011 — In fiction, Christopher Moore's goth teen countess returns, Ian McEwan merges marriage woes with climate change, and Lionel Shriver takes on the ailing health care system. In nonfiction, Deborah Amos describes the forced migration of Sunnis in Iraq, and Rebecca Skloot tells a story of immortality — of sorts.
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