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April 18, 2014 | NPR · The agreement calls on all parties to refrain from violence, requires that illegally-armed groups disarm and that control of government buildings be returned to Ukrainian authorities.
 
April 18, 2014 | NPR · President Obama said enrollment under the Affordable Care Act reached 8 million after the deadline was extended by 2 weeks. The figure represents a turnaround from the disastrous debut of the website.
 
April 18, 2014 | NPR · Morning Edition spent a lot of time recently reporting from the U.S.-Mexico border. President Obama has deported 2 million people from the U.S. But many say that number is misleading.
 

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April 20, 2014 | NPR · California farmers produce an enormous proportion of American produce, but the state is now experiencing a record-breaking drought that is being felt throughout the state and the U.S.
 
April 20, 2014 | NPR · It's been a grim Easter Sunday in South Korea as the death toll continues to rise from the ferry disaster that left nearly 300 passengers, many of them high school students, dead or missing.
 
Courtesy of Jessica Kensky and Patrick Downes
April 20, 2014 | WBUR · Newlyweds Jessica Kensky and Patrick Downes each lost a leg in the Boston Marathon bombing. Rescue the assistance dog helps fetch keys and push buttons, bringing warmth and joy as the couple recovers.
 

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April 19, 2014 | NPR · The search continues for hundreds of people, mostly students, who were on board a South Korean ferry when it sank this week. Correspondent Anthony Kuhn shares the latest with NPR's Wade Goodwyn.
 

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April 20, 2014 | NPR · Monday is the 2014 Boston Marathon. Security will be tight, and this year's race will be an emotional event that will be about more than who wins.
 

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Antiquities

Dec 10, 2013 — Whatever happened on Easter Island, it wasn't good. Polynesians landed there, farmed, thrived, built their famous statues, and then things went very bad, very fast. Sixteen million trees vanished. What happened? Was this a case of ecological collapse? Not exactly, say two anthropologists. It was, arguably, worse than that.
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Sep 17, 2013 — Two short tales: One about bad guys in a fishing village in Pakistan, the other about good guys in Baghdad. And the question is posed: in the long arc of time, which side prevails, those with the impulse to take or those with the impulse to give?
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Jun 30, 2013 — For decades, no one could crack the code to a mysterious ancient script called Linear B. In her new book, Margalit Fox tells the story of the forgotten woman who almost figured it out.
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Jun 21, 2013 — NPR's go-to librarian recommends five "under the radar" books she thinks you should read this summer. They range from a Jane Austenesque love story to a real life, intellectual detective tale.
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May 12, 2011 — Anthropologists and archeologists long believed humans evolved in Asia. So when a set of hominid remains was discovered in Africa, it took a while for the find to stick. In Born in Africa, author Martin Meredith details the battles in the search for the origins of human life.
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Jul 8, 2009 — Two collectors from Utah pleaded guilty this week in the government's crackdown on the looting and trafficking of ancient Native American artifacts. That's a rare success for prosecutors in the decades-long effort to curb an artifacts black market in the Four Corners states.
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Jul 1, 2009 — It took two years and more than $300,000 before federal agents could arrest 17 people in Blanding, Utah, for selling ancient American Indian artifacts on the black market. Locals are upset about the way in which the shouting, gun-wielding agents arrested the suspects.
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Nov 17, 2008 — In 2002, archaeologists claimed a box of ancient bones held the remains of Jesus' brother. Nina Burleigh discusses her book, Unholy Business: The True Tale of Faith, Greed and Forgery in the Holy Land, which explores how forgers create fake artifacts to "prove" Biblical stories to be true.
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Jul 12, 2007 — For 1,000 years, the Anasazi Indians were lords of what's now the American Southwest. Then, apparently without warning, they all but vanished. Commentator Craig Childs says climate changes helped explain their disappearance.
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Feb 13, 2007 — This year marks the 400th anniversary of the first permanent English settlement in America at Jamestown. And that makes Bill Kelso — the man who excavated the site — one very happy archaeologist.
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