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August 27, 2014 | NPR · The report said it couldn't be proven that anyone had died because of wait times at the medical center in Phoenix. On Tuesday, President Obama pledged to do better by vets and announced initiatives.
 
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August 27, 2014 | SCPR · The Los Angeles Unified School District has shut down a half-a-billion-dollar deal with Apple and Pearson to provide classroom technology. Here's what happened.
 
August 27, 2014 | NPR · Schools in Napa Valley are to reopen Wednesday after the area's worst earthquake in decades. Hundreds of buildings and homes were damaged and a lot of rebuilding work remains to be done.
 

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August 27, 2014 | NPR · The end of August heralds the start to the final phase of the 2014 election season. As primaries wrap up and candidates ready themselves for November, NPR's Charlie Mahtesian lays out the political landscape.
 
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August 27, 2014 | NPR · Across the nation, state legislators are gearing up for Election Day. And they're well aware that their fates could be tied to national political forces like the president's low approval rating.
 
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August 27, 2014 | NPR · Irn Bru is a neon orange soda that inspires passion and may help explain the strong independent streak in Scotland as it prepares to vote Sept. 18 on whether to break away from the United Kingdom.
 

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August 23, 2014 | NPR · Nearly 1,500 people have died in the Ebola outbreak, and more nations in the region are closing their borders. NPR's Scott Simon speaks to Africa correspondent Ofeibea Quist-Arcton about the epidemic.
 

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August 24, 2014 | NPR · In the wake of violent clashes between protesters and police in Ferguson, Mo., President Obama is ordering a review of the federal programs that help local police departments purchase military gear.
 

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Antiquities

Dec 10, 2013 — Whatever happened on Easter Island, it wasn't good. Polynesians landed there, farmed, thrived, built their famous statues, and then things went very bad, very fast. Sixteen million trees vanished. What happened? Was this a case of ecological collapse? Not exactly, say two anthropologists. It was, arguably, worse than that.
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Sep 17, 2013 — Two short tales: One about bad guys in a fishing village in Pakistan, the other about good guys in Baghdad. And the question is posed: in the long arc of time, which side prevails, those with the impulse to take or those with the impulse to give?
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Jun 30, 2013 — For decades, no one could crack the code to a mysterious ancient script called Linear B. In her new book, Margalit Fox tells the story of the forgotten woman who almost figured it out.
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Jun 21, 2013 — NPR's go-to librarian recommends five "under the radar" books she thinks you should read this summer. They range from a Jane Austenesque love story to a real life, intellectual detective tale.
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May 12, 2011 — Anthropologists and archeologists long believed humans evolved in Asia. So when a set of hominid remains was discovered in Africa, it took a while for the find to stick. In Born in Africa, author Martin Meredith details the battles in the search for the origins of human life.
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Jul 8, 2009 — Two collectors from Utah pleaded guilty this week in the government's crackdown on the looting and trafficking of ancient Native American artifacts. That's a rare success for prosecutors in the decades-long effort to curb an artifacts black market in the Four Corners states.
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Jul 1, 2009 — It took two years and more than $300,000 before federal agents could arrest 17 people in Blanding, Utah, for selling ancient American Indian artifacts on the black market. Locals are upset about the way in which the shouting, gun-wielding agents arrested the suspects.
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Nov 17, 2008 — In 2002, archaeologists claimed a box of ancient bones held the remains of Jesus' brother. Nina Burleigh discusses her book, Unholy Business: The True Tale of Faith, Greed and Forgery in the Holy Land, which explores how forgers create fake artifacts to "prove" Biblical stories to be true.
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Jul 12, 2007 — For 1,000 years, the Anasazi Indians were lords of what's now the American Southwest. Then, apparently without warning, they all but vanished. Commentator Craig Childs says climate changes helped explain their disappearance.
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Feb 13, 2007 — This year marks the 400th anniversary of the first permanent English settlement in America at Jamestown. And that makes Bill Kelso — the man who excavated the site — one very happy archaeologist.
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