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April 16, 2014 | NPR · Schoolgirls were kidnapped in Nigeria Tuesday. The suspects are believed to be with a radical group blamed for a bombing Monday. Kelly McEvers talks to Michelle Faul of The Associated Press.
 
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April 16, 2014 | NPR · Fans and foes want to know whether the Affordable Care Act is meeting its goals. But, for good reasons, there are no clear answers yet.
 
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April 16, 2014 | NPR · A year after the Boston Marathon bombing, Heather Abbott has adapted to life with her prostheses, including a blade for running and one that allows her to wear her favorite shoes.
 

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April 16, 2014 | NPR · Ukrainian tanks arrived in the city of Kramatorsk Wednesday morning. By the time they rolled out of the city, they were flying Russian flags. People in Kramatorsk tell the story of what happened.
 
April 16, 2014 | NPR · NATO has announced a strengthening of its forces near the alliance's eastern border. Gen. George Joulwan, the former NATO supreme allied commander for Europe, discusses the plan.
 
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April 16, 2014 | NPR · A 325 million-year-old fossil find shows that the gill structures of modern sharks are actually quite different from their ancient ancestors.
 

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April 12, 2014 | NPR · As pro-Russia demonstrators continue their tense standoff in Eastern Ukraine, police are conspicuously absent from city streets.
 

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April 13, 2014 | NPR · As the anniversary of last year's marathon bombing approaches, NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with correspondent Carrie Johnson about the investigation and legal wrangling yet to come.
 

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Military leadership

May 14, 2013 — The ongoing conflict on the Korean Peninsula is the legacy of the Korean War, which helps explain relations between the north and south. In a new book, historian Victor Davis Hanson discusses how the strategies of U.S. Gen. Matthew Ridgway helped to turn around what appeared to be "a lost war."
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Jul 18, 2012 — In The Long Road to Antietam, historian Richard Slotkin traces how both Northern and Southern strategies changed in the summer of 1862, when both sides committed to an all-out total war, and Lincoln squared off against Gen. George McClellan.
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Jul 3, 2012 — Author Rajiv Chandrasekaran believes the U.S. has made multiple miscalculations in waging war in Afghanistan. In his new book, Little America, he says America should have learned from a largely forgotten U.S. adventure undertaken there a half-century earlier.
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Jul 2, 2012 — In his new book Little America, Washington Post correspondent Rajiv Chandrasekaran traces the decision-making process by senior American military officials during the 2009 troop surge in Afghanistan and analyzes their struggle to develop successful policies on the ground.
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Sep 8, 2011 — Over the past few weeks, Talk of the Nation has been asking for the books you think should be required reading for all college freshmen. Here are 10 of your suggestions.
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Aug 22, 2011 — Two hundred years ago this summer, England entered its Regency period. Many associate the era with Colin Firth's turn as Mr. Darcy, but it was also a time of political uncertainty. To celebrate the period's 200th anniversary, author Stephanie Barron suggests three books that put Mr. Firth to shame.
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Jul 26, 2011 — NPR coverage of Seize the Fire: Heroism, Duty, And Nelson's Battle of Trafalgar by Adam Nicolson. News, author interviews, critics' picks and more.
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May 11, 2011 — Summer reading is clearly on the horizon, with a new novel from Scott Turow, P.D. James musing on the mystery genre, John Vaillant on the Siberian tiger, S.C. Gwynne on the Comanche Nation and time to catch up on Bob Woodward's look at Obama's Wars.
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Mar 23, 2011 — The Obama administration insists the military intervention in Libya is a humanitarian effort to protect civilians. But if the real mission proves to be regime change, that may change the equation. Stephen Carter, author of The Violence of Peace, explains the criteria for a "just war."
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Jan 24, 2011 — President Obama may have campaigned as a peace candidate, but in the book The Violence of Peace, author Stephen Carter argues that Obama has largely accepted former President George W. Bush's war policies — and in some cases expanded them.
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