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July 31, 2014 | NPR · In Gaza, the price of drinking water has soared, there's little electricity — and another shortage is beginning: people displaced by the fighting are waiting in long lines to get food.
 
July 31, 2014 | NPR · Christian Science Monitor reporter Christa Case Bryant tells Renee Montagne why the Israeli army is finding Hamas a more formidable foe now than during the 2009 war.
 
July 31, 2014 | NPR · Oklahoma is experiencing more earthquakes, and some scientists say they're caused by wastewater disposal wells. Linda Wertheimer learns more from energy reporter Joe Wertz of StateImpact Oklahoma.
 

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July 30, 2014 | NPR · An explosion rocked a crowded Gaza market during what was expected to be a lull in the fighting. Earlier in the day a United Nations school was hit by what U.N. officials say was Israeli artillery fire, killing at least 15 people. Meanwhile, rocket fire from Gaza continues to be fired into Israel.
 
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July 30, 2014 | NPR · Hamas militants are using tunnels in and out of Gaza to strike inside Israel. Israelis are questioning how the tunnels grew to be so complex and why the military hasn't been able to shut them down.
 
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July 30, 2014 | NPR · A food blogger says dozens of distilleries are buying rye whiskey from a factory in Indiana and using it in bottles labeled "artisan."
 

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July 26, 2014 | NPR · Hezbollah has been a longtime ally of Hamas, but during this most recent conflict between Israel and Gaza they've taken a sideline role. NPR's Scott Simon talks to the BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut.
 

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July 27, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Ukraine near the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 has international investigators staying away. NPR's Arun Rath talks with OSCE's Michael Bociurkiw about the investigation.
 

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Military leadership

May 14, 2013 — The ongoing conflict on the Korean Peninsula is the legacy of the Korean War, which helps explain relations between the north and south. In a new book, historian Victor Davis Hanson discusses how the strategies of U.S. Gen. Matthew Ridgway helped to turn around what appeared to be "a lost war."
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Jul 18, 2012 — In The Long Road to Antietam, historian Richard Slotkin traces how both Northern and Southern strategies changed in the summer of 1862, when both sides committed to an all-out total war, and Lincoln squared off against Gen. George McClellan.
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Jul 3, 2012 — Author Rajiv Chandrasekaran believes the U.S. has made multiple miscalculations in waging war in Afghanistan. In his new book, Little America, he says America should have learned from a largely forgotten U.S. adventure undertaken there a half-century earlier.
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Jul 2, 2012 — In his new book Little America, Washington Post correspondent Rajiv Chandrasekaran traces the decision-making process by senior American military officials during the 2009 troop surge in Afghanistan and analyzes their struggle to develop successful policies on the ground.
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Sep 8, 2011 — Over the past few weeks, Talk of the Nation has been asking for the books you think should be required reading for all college freshmen. Here are 10 of your suggestions.
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Aug 22, 2011 — Two hundred years ago this summer, England entered its Regency period. Many associate the era with Colin Firth's turn as Mr. Darcy, but it was also a time of political uncertainty. To celebrate the period's 200th anniversary, author Stephanie Barron suggests three books that put Mr. Firth to shame.
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Jul 26, 2011 — NPR coverage of Seize the Fire: Heroism, Duty, And Nelson's Battle of Trafalgar by Adam Nicolson. News, author interviews, critics' picks and more.
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May 11, 2011 — Summer reading is clearly on the horizon, with a new novel from Scott Turow, P.D. James musing on the mystery genre, John Vaillant on the Siberian tiger, S.C. Gwynne on the Comanche Nation and time to catch up on Bob Woodward's look at Obama's Wars.
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Mar 23, 2011 — The Obama administration insists the military intervention in Libya is a humanitarian effort to protect civilians. But if the real mission proves to be regime change, that may change the equation. Stephen Carter, author of The Violence of Peace, explains the criteria for a "just war."
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Jan 24, 2011 — President Obama may have campaigned as a peace candidate, but in the book The Violence of Peace, author Stephen Carter argues that Obama has largely accepted former President George W. Bush's war policies — and in some cases expanded them.
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