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September 2, 2014 | NPR · At a Labor Day picnic in Milwaukee, the president accused the GOP of blocking economic initiatives. He urged the sympathetic union audience to turn their frustration into political action in November.
 
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September 2, 2014 | NPR · The city's plan to restructure its debt has been praised as a creative way to protect both pensioners and its art museum. But some creditors — and residents — feel like they're being railroaded.
 
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September 2, 2014 | NPR · A company called WTAS is reviving the defunct accounting firm's name and hoping clients have forgotten its associations with the Enron scandal.
 

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September 2, 2014 | NPR · The Islamist extremist group Islamic State has released a new video that purports to show the beheading of an American journalist named Steven Sotloff, whom the group threatened to kill two weeks ago.
 
September 2, 2014 | NPR · In response to unrest in eastern Ukraine, NATO is considering forming a rapid reaction force — a topic that will be discussed at a summit this week in Wales. But how will Russia react, and is this the right move for the alliance? To learn more, Audie Cornish speaks with Steven Pifer, the director of Arms Control and Non-Proliferation Initiative at the Brookings Institution.
 
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September 2, 2014 | NPR · The Pentagon has been transferring mine-resistant, ambush-protected vehicles to local police. Built to protect U.S. forces from roadside bomb blasts at war, these huge vehicles aren't always welcome.
 

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August 30, 2014 | NPR · Ukrainian forces are defending the port city of Novoazovsk from what they say is a Russian invasion. Scott Simon talks to correspondent Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson.
 

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August 31, 2014 | NPR · Immigration remains one of the most challenging issues for President Obama. Political correspondent Mara Liasson discusses the political cost of the choices before him with Linda Wertheimer.
 

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Military policy

Apr 18, 2013 — Debuting at No. 11, Mark Mazzetti's The Way of the Knife traces the CIA's changing sphere of action.
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Apr 9, 2013 — After a Senate investigation in 1975, the CIA moved away from assassinations and returned to its original mandate, spying. But as New York Times reporter Mark Mazzetti explains in his new book, the Sept. 11 attacks led the CIA back to the business of manhunting.
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Mar 15, 2013 — At No. 3, Rachel Maddow's Drift argues that military bloat has led to a state of near-perpetual war.
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Mar 4, 2013 — In fiction, Nathan Englander's short stories, Amanda Coplin's Pacific Northwest drama and Anthony Giardina's tale of miscalculated suburban escape arrive in paperback. In softcover nonfiction, Rachel Maddow takes stock of America's perpetual wars and Lauren F. Winner reflects on her crisis of faith.
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Nov 26, 2012 — In his new book, journalist Gregory Johnsen charts the rise of Yemen as a haven for al-Qaida and explores the recent history of radical Islam in the Arabian Peninsula. The death of Osama bin Laden, he says, had more of an effect on the U.S. psyche than it did on people in Yemen.
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Jul 3, 2012 — Author Rajiv Chandrasekaran believes the U.S. has made multiple miscalculations in waging war in Afghanistan. In his new book, Little America, he says America should have learned from a largely forgotten U.S. adventure undertaken there a half-century earlier.
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Jul 2, 2012 — In his new book Little America, Washington Post correspondent Rajiv Chandrasekaran traces the decision-making process by senior American military officials during the 2009 troop surge in Afghanistan and analyzes their struggle to develop successful policies on the ground.
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May 7, 2012 — In her new book, MSNBC anchor Rachel Maddow invokes Thomas Jefferson to argue for limited government — at least in the case of the military. She argues that sometimes we got to war because we've invested so much in military strength.
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Apr 5, 2012Rachel Maddow explores the state of American national security in Drift, which debuts at No. 1.
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Mar 27, 2012 — The popular MSNBC host talks about her start in broadcasting, her life and her new book Drift: The Unmooring of American Military Power, in which she argues that America's national defense has become disconnected from public oversight.
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