Latest News from NPR

on:

NCPR is supported by:

 
Hourly Newscast
4 min., 45 sec.

Programs

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Latest Features:
July 29, 2014 | NPR · House and Senate negotiators reached a compromise, $17 billion agreement to improve medical care for veterans. The deal comes in the final week before Congress leaves town for a monthlong recess.
 
July 29, 2014 | NPR · Washington Post reporter Liz Sly tells Renee Montagne that U.S. arms may be flowing to moderate Syrian rebels, but the aid seems to be too little too late to affect the course of the civil war.
 
AFP/Getty Images
July 28, 2014 | NPR · The militant group threatens to kill parents who immunize their children. As a result, polio has come roaring back in Pakistan. Eradication now hinges on whether the country can control the virus.
 

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Latest Features:
Courtesy of Samaritan's Purse
July 29, 2014 | KERA · After caring for Ebola patients for several months in West Africa, Dr. Kent Brantly noticed last week that he had symptoms. The 33-year-old immediately put himself into a Liberian isolation ward.
 
July 29, 2014 | NPR · Virologist Thomas Geisbert has spent decades studying Ebola and other hemorrhagic fevers. He speaks to Audie Cornish about the current Ebola outbreak, the worst in history, and how it might be contained this time around.
 
July 29, 2014 | NPR · The Eid festival, which celebrates the end of Ramadan, serves as a time for visiting relatives and exchanging gifts. But one family's holiday in Gaza traces the death and displacement wrought by the war between Hamas and Israel.
 

Latest Saturday rundown




WE Saturday Feature

July 26, 2014 | NPR · Hezbollah has been a longtime ally of Hamas, but during this most recent conflict between Israel and Gaza they've taken a sideline role. NPR's Scott Simon talks to the BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut.
 

Latest Sunday rundown


WE Sunday Feature

July 27, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Ukraine near the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 has international investigators staying away. NPR's Arun Rath talks with OSCE's Michael Bociurkiw about the investigation.
 

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Decision making

May 13, 2013 — In a new book, former U.S. Sen. Olympia Snowe explores how to fix the gridlock in Congress. Earlier this year, the Republican from Maine left the Senate out of frustration with the partisan stalemate. "It has to change, for the country," she says. "People deserve ... better representation."
Launch in player | Comments |
Apr 26, 2013 — At No. 4, Daniel Kahneman's Thinking, Fast And Slow explores the psychology of decision-making.
Comments |
Apr 18, 2013 — Debuting at No. 11, Mark Mazzetti's The Way of the Knife traces the CIA's changing sphere of action.
Comments |
Apr 9, 2013 — After a Senate investigation in 1975, the CIA moved away from assassinations and returned to its original mandate, spying. But as New York Times reporter Mark Mazzetti explains in his new book, the Sept. 11 attacks led the CIA back to the business of manhunting.
Launch in player | Comments |
Oct 22, 2012 — Novelist Jodi Picoult explores life and death, while oncologist David Agus models new health practices, virologist Nathan Wolfe tracks emerging diseases, Dava Sobel reflects on Copernicus, and Charles Shields looks at novelist Kurt Vonnegut.
Comments |
Jul 10, 2012 — Where do ideas come from and how can we have more of them? Science writer Jonah Lehrer recommends five books that explore the mysteries of the creative mind, and document the strange and beautiful world that our ideas have helped create.
Comments |
Mar 13, 2012 — Novelist Jodi Picoult isn't afraid to traverse morally fraught terrain in her tense family dramas, making her an unlikely fixture on the best-sellers charts. Her latest, Lone Wolf, follows two siblings who disagree about whether to continue medical care for their comatose father.
Launch in player | Comments |
Mar 8, 2012 — In Jodi Picoult's Lone Wolf, debuting at No. 3, siblings debate how to care for a comatose father.
Comments |
Dec 8, 2011Thinking, Fast and Slow — an exploration of decision making — appears on the list for a second week.
Comments |
Oct 19, 2011 — Daniel Kahneman won a Nobel Prize in 2002 for his work on the psychology of decision-making. Now, in Thinking, Fast and Slow, Kahneman revisits and recasts his world-famous research on what he calls "the machinery of the mind."
Launch in player | Comments |
more Decision making from NPR