Latest News from NPR

on:

NCPR is supported by:

 
Hourly Newscast
4 min., 45 sec.

Programs

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Latest Features:
April 18, 2014 | NPR · The agreement calls on all parties to refrain from violence, requires that illegally-armed groups disarm and that control of government buildings be returned to Ukrainian authorities.
 
April 18, 2014 | NPR · President Obama said enrollment under the Affordable Care Act reached 8 million after the deadline was extended by 2 weeks. The figure represents a turnaround from the disastrous debut of the website.
 
April 18, 2014 | NPR · Morning Edition spent a lot of time recently reporting from the U.S.-Mexico border. President Obama has deported 2 million people from the U.S. But many say that number is misleading.
 

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Latest Features:
AP
April 19, 2014 | NPR · The military's training center at Fort Irwin in California is complete with mock Middle Eastern villages. But as the U.S. combat mission in Afghanistan winds down, how will this facility change?
 
April 19, 2014 | NPR · In the Ukrainian city of Donetsk, the opposing camps seem increasingly entrenched, despite a diplomatic effort to ease tensions. Pro-Russian forces refuse to leave occupied buildings and public squares in the east. It's an uneasy Easter weekend and neither side is willing to budge.
 
April 19, 2014 | NPR · Russia is in the middle of a planned upgrade and expansion of its military forces, but global affairs professor Mark Galeotti tells NPR's Arun Rath that Russia's military has its limits.
 

Latest Saturday rundown




WE Saturday Feature

April 19, 2014 | NPR · The search continues for hundreds of people, mostly students, who were on board a South Korean ferry when it sank this week. Correspondent Anthony Kuhn shares the latest with NPR's Wade Goodwyn.
 

Latest Sunday rundown


WE Sunday Feature

April 20, 2014 | NPR · Monday is the 2014 Boston Marathon. Security will be tight, and this year's race will be an emotional event that will be about much more than who wins.
 

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Military relations

Jul 1, 2013 — In softcover nonfiction, David Crist looks at America's conflict with Iran and Oliver Sacks investigates hallucinations. In fiction, Ian McEwan delivers a Cold War thriller, Tom Wolfe explores racial and ethnic conflict in Miami and Emma Straub tracks a small town girl's rise to Hollywood stardom.
Comments |
Jul 23, 2012 — In The Twilight War, historian David Crist outlines the secret history of America's 30-year conflict with Iran. Based on interviews with hundreds of officials as well as classified military archives, the book details how the covert war has repeatedly threatened to bring the two nations into open warfare.
Launch in player | Comments |
Jul 18, 2012 — David Crist's The Twilight War is a realistic — and often pessimistic — analysis of America's relationship with Iran. Crist covers decades of policy and history, while balancing this military and diplomatic detail with concern for humanity in his narratives.
Comments |
May 11, 2011 — Summer reading is clearly on the horizon, with a new novel from Scott Turow, P.D. James musing on the mystery genre, John Vaillant on the Siberian tiger, S.C. Gwynne on the Comanche Nation and time to catch up on Bob Woodward's look at Obama's Wars.
Comments |
Feb 2, 2011 — Journalist Thanassis Cambanis puts what has been going on in Egypt in a historical context — and explains what the popularity of other political parties, like Hezbollah, could mean for relations with Israel and the United States.
Launch in player | Comments |
Dec 13, 2010 — Bob Woodward chronicled the struggles between the White House and Pentagon that lead to that decision in his most recent book, Obama's Wars. Many of those tensions continue to play out today in decisions on the way forward in Afghanistan.
Launch in player | Comments |
Feb 3, 2010Citizens of London is Lynne Olson's history of three Americans who helped steer the United States toward World War II. Edward R. Murrow, Averell Harriman and John Gilbert Winant sold the war to the American public and to President Franklin D. Roosevelt.
Launch in player | Comments |
Aug 31, 2006 — Fouad Ajami supported the U.S.-led war in Iraq. In a new book, The Foreigner's Gift, he says that the war went wrong because of the Arab world's prejudice against Shia Muslims and against the Americans who expected to help them lead Iraq.
Launch in player | Comments |
Jul 18, 2005 — Host Neal Conan and guests examine how al Qaeda and other terrorist groups recruit and train suicide bombers.
Launch in player | Comments |
more Military relations from NPR