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April 16, 2014 | NPR · Schoolgirls were kidnapped in Nigeria Tuesday. The suspects are believed to be with a radical group blamed for a bombing Monday. Kelly McEvers talks to Michelle Faul of The Associated Press.
 
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April 16, 2014 | NPR · Fans and foes want to know whether the Affordable Care Act is meeting its goals. But, for good reasons, there are no clear answers yet.
 
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April 16, 2014 | NPR · A year after the Boston Marathon bombing, Heather Abbott has adapted to life with her prostheses, including a blade for running and one that allows her to wear her favorite shoes.
 

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April 16, 2014 | NPR · Ukrainian tanks arrived in the city of Kramatorsk Wednesday morning. By the time they rolled out of the city, they were flying Russian flags. People in Kramatorsk tell the story of what happened.
 
April 16, 2014 | NPR · NATO has announced a strengthening of its forces near the alliance's eastern border. Gen. George Joulwan, the former NATO supreme allied commander for Europe, discusses the plan.
 
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April 16, 2014 | NPR · A 325 million-year-old fossil find shows that the gill structures of modern sharks are actually quite different from their ancient ancestors.
 

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April 12, 2014 | NPR · As pro-Russia demonstrators continue their tense standoff in Eastern Ukraine, police are conspicuously absent from city streets.
 

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April 13, 2014 | NPR · As the anniversary of last year's marathon bombing approaches, NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with correspondent Carrie Johnson about the investigation and legal wrangling yet to come.
 

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Patients

Nov 25, 2013 — In The Man He Became, historian James Tobin says, despite misimpressions to the contrary, Americans of Franklin Roosevelt's day were well-aware of his disability — it was an important part of the personal narrative that helped him win the presidency.
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Oct 7, 2013 — In softcover fiction, Will Self spelunks the depths of consciousness in a mental hospital; Amity Gaige divulges an East German immigrant's secrets; Cristina Garcia defines the space that separates a dictator from an exile; and Ayana Mathis follows the life of a mother during the Great Migration.
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Aug 27, 2013 — In softcover nonfiction, Elizabeth Cline explores the high costs of cheap clothing, D.T. Max sheds light on the life and death of author David Foster Wallace, and Marco Roth reflects on his intellectual upbringing on New York's Upper West Side.
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Aug 16, 2013 — In Brain on Fire, appearing at No. 9, Susannah Cahalan looks back on her battle with a rare disease.
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Aug 5, 2013 — In softcover nonfiction, David Randall examines the science of sleep, and Susannah Cahalan falls prey to a mysterious disease. In fiction, Claire Vaye Watkins explores the American West, and Ivan Doig looks at a single dad whose world is upended.
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Jun 14, 2013The End Of Your Life Book Club, appearing at No. 8, tells of bonding over books during chemotherapy.
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Mar 19, 2013 — Emily Rapp lived every parent's nightmare when her infant son was diagnosed with a fatal disease. The Still Point of the Turning World is not only a powerful memoir of a mother's endurance but also a meditation on how our mortality should inspire us all to live life ferociously in the present.
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Mar 18, 2013 — In 2011, Emily Rapp's baby was diagnosed with Tay-Sachs disease, a genetic, degenerative condition with no cure. He died just shy of his third birthday. In her new memoir, The Still Point of the Turning World, Rapp writes about what it's like to care for a terminally ill child.
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Mar 5, 2013 — Pat Summitt grew up on a rural farm and went on to a stellar career in basketball. As head coach of the Tennessee Lady Vols, she won more games than any other basketball coach in NCAA history. Her new memoir, Sum It Up, records her memories even as she is losing them to Alzheimer's.
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Feb 18, 2013 — It was one of the most revolutionary tools of biomedical research: the immortal HeLa cell line. But few people know the cells belonged to a poor Southern tobacco farmer named Henrietta Lacks. Rebecca Skloot spent years researching Lacks and tells her story in The Immortal Life Of Henrietta Lacks.
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