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August 20, 2014 | NPR · If you venture away from the protest zone in Ferguson, Mo., there is an idyllic neighborhood, which doesn't have much patience for the out-of-towners who have joined the protests.
 
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August 20, 2014 | NPR · President Obama has carefully avoided taking sides following the shooting of Missouri teen Michael Brown, disappointing some African-American observers.
 
August 20, 2014 | NPR · Texas ranks 49th out of 50 states in how much funding it commits to mental health. But San Antonio has become a model for other mental health systems. It has saved $50 million over the past 5 years.
 

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August 20, 2014 | NPR · Demonstrators want an indictment of the police officer who fatally shot Michael Brown earlier this month. But investigations — one of them a federal civil rights case — can take weeks, if not months.
 
August 20, 2014 | NPR · More than a week now from the police shooting in Ferguson, Mo., it's worth asking: Ideally, what should happen with a police officer stops someone in the street?
 
August 20, 2014 | NPR · After the Liberian government ordered a quarantine of one of the poorest neighborhoods in its capital, Monrovia, residents there woke up to find themselves cut off from the rest of the city by security forces. By midday, the neighborhood was in riot.
 

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August 16, 2014 | NPR · Both Ukraine and Russia say they're trying to send supplies to residents in eastern Ukraine. But with tensions on both sides running high, that aid may take a while to arrive.
 

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August 17, 2014 | NPR · American fighter jets and drones carried out airstrikes against Islamist targets near the Mosul Dam in northern Iraq on Saturday. A breach of the dam could threaten entire cities.
 

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Civil rights workers

Aug 31, 2013 — John Lewis is a congressman from Georgia, a pillar of the civil rights movement and an author. Add to that resume something slightly less expected — comic book writer. Lewis is getting ready to release March, the new graphic novel of his life.
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Aug 14, 2013 — Before the nation's attention turned to the March on Washington, William Moore was making his own pilgrimage for racial equality. He intended to walk from Tennessee to Jackson, Miss., to ask the Mississippi governor to end segregation — but the Baltimore mail carrier never reached his destination.
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Apr 28, 2011 — Wednesday markets the 50th anniversary of the start of the Freedom Rides, when an integrated group of Civil Rights activists rode together by bus through the deep South challenging integration. Historian Raymond Arsenault recounts their journey in Freedom Riders.
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Mar 4, 2009Tell Me More salutes Women's History Month with a commemoration of civil rights pioneer Ida B. Wells. Paula Giddings, author of the book Ida: A Sword Among Lions, tells how Wells forged a unique path in the early civil rights movement.
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Jul 4, 2007 — Bestselling author, poet and civil rights activist Maya Angelou is considered to be among the greatest writers alive today. In this week's Wisdom Watch, Angelou talks — and sings — about why she feels proud to be an American woman of color. Her latest book is A Song Flung Up to Heaven, the final volume of her memoirs.
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Jan 18, 2006 — Farai Chideya concludes her two-part conversation with author Tananarive Due. Due talks about the inspiration for her civil rights memoir Freedom in the Family, which she co-authored with her mother.
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Jan 12, 2006 — In 1961, the Freedom Riders set out for the Deep South to defy Jim Crow laws and call for change. Their efforts transformed the civil rights movement. Raymond Arsenault is the author of 'Freedom Riders: 1961 and the Struggle for Racial Justice'.
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Dec 14, 2005Day to Day reporter Karen Grigsby Bates, doing double duty as literary editor, shares her list of books that would make great gifts for the holidays.
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Aug 11, 2005 — The Watts Riots began in Los Angeles 40 years ago Thursday, a six-day eruption of racial frustration that left 34 people dead, hundreds more injured and scores of buildings damaged, looted or destroyed. Karen Grigsby Bates visits the 77th Street police station in the heart of Watts with writer Karl Fleming, who witnessed the riots as a reporter for Newsweek magazine.
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Jul 19, 2005 — Journalist Karl Fleming's new book is Son of the Rough South: An Uncivil Memoir. As a civil rights reporter for Newsweek in the 1960s, he wrote about major events such as the Birmingham church bombing, the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr., and the murders of three civil rights workers in Philadelphia, Miss. While at the 1966 riots in the Watts section of Los Angeles, Fleming was severely beaten.
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