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July 31, 2014 | NPR · Tens of thousands of displaced Gazans face skyrocketing prices for limited water supplies, and severely disrupted electricity service. As well, long lines are developing for staples like bread.
 
July 31, 2014 | NPR · Christian Science Monitor reporter Christa Case Bryant tells Renee Montagne why the Israeli army is finding Hamas a more formidable foe now than during the 2009 war.
 
July 31, 2014 | NPR · Oklahoma is experiencing more earthquakes, and some scientists say they're caused by wastewater disposal wells. Linda Wertheimer learns more from energy reporter Joe Wertz of StateImpact Oklahoma.
 

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July 31, 2014 | NPR · Israel's military has called up 16,000 more reservists, stoking fears of a widening offensive in Gaza. Aid workers are warning of a growing humanitarian crisis in the region, including a significant displaced population and a potential shortage of drinking water.
 
July 31, 2014 | NPR · Nearly a month into the war in Gaza, pollsters have been taking a look at how attitudes in the region have changed among Israelis and Palestinians.
 
July 31, 2014 | NPR · A surge of new cases in West Africa's Ebola virus outbreak has health officials worried that the epidemic is getting worse. Sierra Leone, for one, has declared a state of emergency, sending in troops to quarantine some of the hardest hit communities.
 

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July 26, 2014 | NPR · Hezbollah has been a longtime ally of Hamas, but during this most recent conflict between Israel and Gaza they've taken a sideline role. NPR's Scott Simon talks to the BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut.
 

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July 27, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Ukraine near the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 has international investigators staying away. NPR's Arun Rath talks with OSCE's Michael Bociurkiw about the investigation.
 

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Slavery

Apr 16, 2014 — The announcement of the winners and finalists for the Pulitzer Prizes gives us an opportunity to herald great journalism that illuminates matters relating to race, ethnicity and culture.
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Mar 28, 2014 — In a his book, historian Bruce Levine says that from the destruction of the South emerged an entirely new country, making the Civil War equivalent to a second American Revolution.
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Nov 20, 2013 — On Tuesday night, finalists for the National Book Awards read from their nominated works at The New School in New York City. The National Book Foundation will announce the winners Wednesday night.
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Nov 15, 2013 — The 1853 memoir of free man turned captive Solomon Northup, Twelve Years a Slave, appears at No. 10.
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Sep 17, 2013 — In Ebony & Ivy, an MIT historian details how the nation's colleges helped justify and benefited from the slave trade.
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Aug 15, 2013 — Through years of careful research, author Andrea Stuart discovered that her bloodline includes both slaves and slave owners. In her book Sugar in the Blood, she writes about her own family, and about the history of slavery in the Caribbean.
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Feb 4, 2013 — In her new book, Andrea Stuart explores the intersection of sugar, slavery, settlement, migration and survival in the Americas. Stuart's personal history was shaped by these forces — she is descended from a slave owner who had relations with an unknown slave.
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Jan 7, 2013 — In a new book, Civil War historian Bruce Levine says that from the destruction of the South emerged an entirely new country, making the Civil War equivalent to a second American Revolution. Integral to the Union's victory, he says, were the nearly 200,000 black soldiers who enlisted.
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Jul 16, 2012 — In Help Me to Find My People, Heather Andrea Williams uses artifacts from the post-Civil War era to explore the emotional toll of separation on families during slavery, and of their arduous journeys to reconnect.
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Jul 5, 2012 — Washington, D.C., in the 1830s was a city of ferment. Free blacks were moving in, eventually outnumbering the city's slaves — a development that made whites very nervous. Those tensions came to a head in the now-forgotten race riot of 1835, an episode detailed in author Jefferson Morley's new book.
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