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August 28, 2014 | NPR · For the first time, researchers have tracked the spread of Ebola, almost in real time, during an outbreak. The virus is quickly changing its genetic code. But it's unclear what the mutations mean.
 
August 29, 2014 | NPR · French President Francois Hollande is under pressure to fix the country's economy, which is overburdened by regulation and failing a generation of young people. He's also facing calls for austerity.
 
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August 29, 2014 | NPR · Congressman and former Republican vice presidential nominee Paul Ryan discusses his new book, The Way Forward: Renewing the American Idea.
 

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August 30, 2014 | NPR · In Ukraine, worried officials in the southeastern part of the country beefed up their defenses on Saturday as rebel forces slowly moved west following the recent capture of a strategic seaside town.
 
August 30, 2014 | NPR · Arun Rath talks to former U.S. Ambassador to Ukraine Steven Pifer about NATO and EU options for confronting Russian aggression in Ukraine.
 
August 30, 2014 | NPR · More than 500 people may have traveled from the U.K. to Syria to fight in its civil war. Arun Rath talks to Jessica Stern, author of Terror In The Name Of God, about how it's drawing Westerners.
 

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August 30, 2014 | NPR · Ukrainian forces are defending the port city of Novoazovsk from what they say is a Russian invasion. Scott Simon talks to correspondent Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson.
 

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August 24, 2014 | NPR · In the wake of violent clashes between protesters and police in Ferguson, Mo., President Obama is ordering a review of the federal programs that help local police departments purchase military gear.
 

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Judicial error

Jan 27, 2013 — Bill Macumber, a respected member of his Arizona community, was convicted of a grisly 1962 double murder. Late last year, however, he was released from prison. A new book tells the story of a flawed investigation and legal process that cost Macumber 38 years of freedom.
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Jul 2, 2012 — Author Solomon Jones says death can seem angelic at first — especially to the lost, addicted kids in his book The Last Confession. He says many of his stories come from his own experiences as a homeless drug addict on the streets of Philadelphia.
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Apr 25, 2012 — The recent documentary Bully and a series of tragic stories have brought national attention to the issue. NPR's Michel Martin asks whether there's something important missing from the conversation: the question "why?"
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Jul 17, 2011 — NPR coverage of Arthur And George by Julian Barnes. News, author interviews, critics' picks and more.
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May 24, 2011 — In 1989, a white female jogger was brutally raped in New York City's Central Park. Author Sarah Burns revisits the crime — and the wrongful conviction that put five African-American teens in prison.
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Dec 15, 2010 — The topics of murder, theft and wartime made for some thrilling fiction this year. Critic Maureen Corrigan of Fresh Air picks the best mystery and suspense novels of 2010, in which the past comes back to haunt.
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Oct 11, 2006 — John Grisham says he could never have come up with the story that's chronicled in his first work of nonfiction, The Innocent Man. It's the tragic tale of Ron Williamson, a small-town sports hero from Oklahoma wrongly convicted of murder.
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Jan 26, 2006 — An infamous case of wrongful conviction — which took the efforts of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle to resolve — is the subject of the new novel from Julian Barnes. Arthur and George vividly details how the lives of two utter strangers intersected in what was known as "the Great Wyrley Outrages."
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