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August 22, 2014 | NPR · The standoff between the U.S. and Russia over Ukraine has raised the specter of a new Cold War. David Greene talks to Julie Ioffe, of the New Republic, about what Russia's next move may be in Ukraine.
 
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August 22, 2014 | NPR · Even just the word Ebola is kind of terrifying. Why? Hollywood has a lot to do with it. But Ebola outbreaks also have all the ingredients for what one psychologist calls the "dread factor."
 
August 22, 2014 | NPR · Census Bureau data show a wider gap between rich and poor. Kelly McEvers explores this with economist Enrico Moretti of the University of California-Berkeley, author of The New Geography of Jobs.
 

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August 22, 2014 | NPR · It's been another rough August for President Obama. He's wrapping up a summer vacation marred by events in Ferguson, Mo., and the murder of an American journalist in the Middle East.
 
August 22, 2014 | NPR · Regular political commentators, E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and Reihan Salam of The National Review, discuss the killing of American journalist James Foley and the ongoing conflict in Ferguson, Mo.
 
August 22, 2014 | NPR · The scent of fresh pencils is in the air, and homework assignments are around the corner. In honor of back-to-school season, author Alexander Aciman recommends The Lost Estate by Henri Alain-Fournier.
 

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August 16, 2014 | NPR · Both Ukraine and Russia say they're trying to send supplies to residents in eastern Ukraine. But with tensions on both sides running high, that aid may take a while to arrive.
 

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August 17, 2014 | NPR · American fighter jets and drones carried out airstrikes against Islamist targets near the Mosul Dam in northern Iraq on Saturday. A breach of the dam could threaten entire cities.
 

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Nature

Dec 10, 2013 — Whatever happened on Easter Island, it wasn't good. Polynesians landed there, farmed, thrived, built their famous statues, and then things went very bad, very fast. Sixteen million trees vanished. What happened? Was this a case of ecological collapse? Not exactly, say two anthropologists. It was, arguably, worse than that.
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Dec 6, 2013 — When bees disappeared from central China years ago, Chinese apple farmers had to pollinate by hand. Embarrassing — people doing bees' work, but then came the big discovery — a surprise that still haunts the conservation movement. What if people outperform bees?
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Sep 17, 2013 — Two short tales: One about bad guys in a fishing village in Pakistan, the other about good guys in Baghdad. And the question is posed: in the long arc of time, which side prevails, those with the impulse to take or those with the impulse to give?
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Jul 28, 2013 — Despite being a big city paper, The New York Times has featured Verlyn Klinkenborg's editorials about life on his farm for years. A new collection of his essays, More Scenes from the Rural Life, offers even the city slickers a chance to daydream about cows.
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Jan 26, 2013 — Written and Illustrated by Jon Klassen, This Is Not My Hat tells the story of a little fish on the run after stealing a small, blue hat from a slumbering big fish. Runners-up for the medal included a tribute to the color green and a tale of colorful yarn in a black-and-white world.
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Jul 17, 2011 — NPR coverage of Natives And Exotics by Jane Alison. News, author interviews, critics' picks and more.
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Jul 15, 2011 — NPR coverage of More: Population, Nature, and What Women Want by Robert Engelman. News, author interviews, critics' picks and more.
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Apr 26, 2011 — The biography of a cigar worker turned respected baseball executive, a petite book of poetry perfect for the season, a huge chronicle of a cook and his vegetable patch, and a mother's day gift book that celebrates moms as fashion plates.
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Apr 19, 2010 — The anthology of African-American nature poetry features work by contemporary writers, and writers like 18th century poet Phillis Wheatley. Camille T. Dungy, the editor of the collection, says the poems offer a different view of the natural world.
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May 30, 2008 — How do population, natural resources and women's rights all intersect? Author Robert Engelman explains in a new book how allowing women to control their reproduction can lead to a more sustainable planet
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