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April 17, 2014 | NPR · Scientists and food activists are launching a campaign to promote seeds that can be freely shared, rather than protected through patents and licenses. They call it the Open Source Seed Initiative.
 
April 17, 2014 | NPR · Brazil is the spiritual home of soccer and a world powerhouse in the sport. It's woven into the Brazilian psyche. Wins and losses have had repercussions in other realms — including politics.
 
April 17, 2014 | NPR · Last week marked another low-point in the Syrian civil war. A unidentified gunman assassinated a Dutch priest in the city of Homs. Father Frans van der Lugt had lived in Syria for nearly five decades.
 

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April 16, 2014 | NPR · Ukrainian tanks arrived in the city of Kramatorsk Wednesday morning. By the time they rolled out of the city, they were flying Russian flags. People in Kramatorsk tell the story of what happened.
 
April 16, 2014 | NPR · NATO has announced a strengthening of its forces near the alliance's eastern border. Gen. George Joulwan, the former NATO supreme allied commander for Europe, discusses the plan.
 
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April 16, 2014 | NPR · A 325 million-year-old fossil find shows that the gill structures of modern sharks are actually quite different from their ancient ancestors.
 

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April 12, 2014 | NPR · As pro-Russia demonstrators continue their tense standoff in Eastern Ukraine, police are conspicuously absent from city streets.
 

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April 13, 2014 | NPR · As the anniversary of last year's marathon bombing approaches, NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with correspondent Carrie Johnson about the investigation and legal wrangling yet to come.
 

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Haiti

Dec 4, 2013 — NPR staff and critics selected more than 200 standout titles. Now it's up to you: Choose your own adventure! Use our tags to search through books and find the perfect read for yourself or someone else.
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Sep 13, 2013 — A 7-year-old girl goes missing in Edwidge Danticat's Claire of the Sea Light. It debuts at No. 10.
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Aug 31, 2013 — In his new book, The Woman Who Lost Her Soul, Bob Shacochis returns to Haiti, but also takes the reader across continents and generations. The 700-page book has been compared to the work of Joseph Conrad, Graham Greene and Norman Mailer.
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Aug 25, 2013Claire of the Sea Light is award-winning author Edwidge Danticat's newest work of fiction. She spoke to host Rachel Martin about how experiences of her own childhood in Haiti are reflected in her young protagonist.
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Aug 22, 2013Tell Me More's summer reading series, 'Island Reads,' highlights authors from the Caribbean. Guest host Celeste Headlee talks to Julia Alvarez. Her book A Wedding In Haiti gives readers a peek into the county that Alvarez calls 'the sister I hardly knew.'
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Mar 18, 2013 — Julia Alvarez's story of a promise kept, Alice Kaplan's account of three American women in Paris, Bart D. Ehrman's inquiry into the identity of Jesus, and Andrew Nagorski's survey of Americans who witnessed Hitler's ascent arrive in paperback.
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Apr 18, 2012 — When Julia Alvarez told a lonely Haitian boy that she would attend his wedding someday, she didn't expect that she would be held to her word. Her new memoir tells the story of her journey to a remote village in Haiti to make good on her promise.
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Apr 28, 2011 — In fiction, John le Carre takes a cold look at the Russian mafia state, while Isabel Allende and Andrea Levy explore the contradictions of slavery, and Katherine Stockett probes 1960s Southern racial politics. In nonfiction, Ethan Watters decries the export of U.S. mental health treatments.
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Dec 28, 2010 — In her recent collection of essays, Haitian-American author Edwidge Danticat takes readers beyond the rubble, on a journey of history, culture and healing.
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Sep 9, 2010 — Nine months after the quake in Haiti, Haitian-born author Edwidge Danticat is sharing the earthquake story with an audience that was largely shielded from it — children. Eight Days is a book about a boy who gets buried in the rubble and is not rescued until eight days later.
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