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September 2, 2014 | NPR · At a Labor Day picnic in Milwaukee, the president accused the GOP of blocking economic initiatives. He urged the sympathetic union audience to turn their frustration into political action in November.
 
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September 2, 2014 | NPR · The city's plan to restructure its debt has been praised as a creative way to protect both pensioners and its art museum. But some creditors — and residents — feel like they're being railroaded.
 
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September 2, 2014 | NPR · A company called WTAS is reviving the defunct accounting firm's name and hoping clients have forgotten its associations with the Enron scandal.
 

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September 1, 2014 | NPR · Ebola has exposed weaknesses in Africa's health networks and a failure to work together to arrest the spread of the virus. The "not our problem" response is taking an economic toll on the continent.
 
September 1, 2014 | NPR · Nearly 260 health workers in West Africa have been infected, and 134 have died. Dr. Robert Garry of Tulane University, who worked with five who died, discusses the devastation in the community.
 
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September 1, 2014 | NPR · Ads with candidates shooting guns are proliferating this year. It can all be traced back to Sen. Joe Manchin's famed 2010 spot "Dead Aim."
 

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August 30, 2014 | NPR · Ukrainian forces are defending the port city of Novoazovsk from what they say is a Russian invasion. Scott Simon talks to correspondent Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson.
 

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August 31, 2014 | NPR · Immigration remains one of the most challenging issues for President Obama. Political correspondent Mara Liasson discusses the political cost of the choices before him with Linda Wertheimer.
 

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Mental illness

Aug 7, 2012 — More than 75,000 of you voted for your favorite young-adult fiction. Now, after all the nominating, sorting and counting, the final results are in. Here are the 100 best teen novels, chosen by the NPR audience.
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Jul 15, 2011 — NPR coverage of Wish Her Safe at Home by Stephen Benatar and John Carey. News, author interviews, critics' picks and more.
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Apr 28, 2011 — In fiction, John le Carre takes a cold look at the Russian mafia state, while Isabel Allende and Andrea Levy explore the contradictions of slavery, and Katherine Stockett probes 1960s Southern racial politics. In nonfiction, Ethan Watters decries the export of U.S. mental health treatments.
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Feb 8, 2011 — Like Persepolis or Maus, Darryl Cunningham's Psychiatric Tales pairs inked drawings with a personal story to create an intensely affecting memoir. In this debut, Cunningham debunks stigmas of mental illnesses, and offers his perspective on living with them.
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Feb 3, 2010 — The main character of Stephen Benatar's 1982 novel Wish Her Safe at Home is a middle-aged London woman who inherits a run-down house from her aunt. The book, now in paperback for the first time, blends bright fantasy with a creeping darkness.
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Jan 12, 2010 — Author Ethan Watters thinks that America is "homogenizing the way the world goes mad." In Crazy Like Us, he describes how America's approach to mental illness has spread to other cultures around the world, in a "globalization of the American psyche."
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Dec 23, 2009 — Travel can be stressful, with flight delays, waiting rooms, and hours in economy class. One of the best ways to survive this mayhem is with a good book. Author Susan Jane Gilman offers suggestions for six great books that won't embarrass you in airports.
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Dec 23, 2009 — Miriam Toews' novel is a light, modern On the Road: a poignant American road-trip novel with a twist. It's Canadian.
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Nov 10, 2009 — More staff picks of standout books. This week, new nonfiction: Newspaperman Harold Evans traces his rise, while poet Mary Karr details her fall — and redemption. Nina Totenberg reads the Scalia biography. And great detective writers reveal the origins of their famous sleuths.
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Nov 3, 2009The Liar's Club, Mary Karr's memoir about her hardscrabble childhood in Texas, was named one of the best books of 1995. In her new book, Lit, Karr details her early adult years and her struggles with alcohol, depression and motherhood.
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