Latest News from NPR

on:

NCPR is supported by:

 
Hourly Newscast
4 min., 45 sec.

Programs

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Latest Features:
September 1, 2014 | NPR · A Guinean student in the Senegalese capital of Dakar has tested positive for the deadly disease. David Greene talks to Krista Larson, West Africa correspondent for the Associated Press.
 
September 1, 2014 | NPR · Protesters surrounded Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif's home, and for a brief period forced government TV off the air. Steve Inskeep talks to Jon Boone, a correspondent for The Guardian in Islamabad.
 
YouTube
September 1, 2014 | NPR · A widely watched video shows a foreigner fainting on a subway car and everyone around him fleeing. No one helps. It's rekindled a national debate about trust, fear and the Chinese national character.
 

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Latest Features:
September 1, 2014 | NPR · Ebola has exposed weaknesses in Africa's health networks and a failure to work together to arrest the spread of the virus. The "not our problem" response is taking an economic toll on the continent.
 
September 1, 2014 | NPR · Nearly 260 health workers in West Africa have been infected, and 134 have died. Dr. Robert Garry of Tulane University, who worked with five who died, discusses the devastation in the community.
 
YouTube
September 1, 2014 | NPR · Ads with candidates shooting guns are proliferating this year, and it can all be traced back to Sen. Joe Manchin's famed 2010 spot titled "Dead Aim."
 

Latest Saturday rundown




WE Saturday Feature

August 30, 2014 | NPR · Ukrainian forces are defending the port city of Novoazovsk from what they say is a Russian invasion. Scott Simon talks to correspondent Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson.
 

Latest Sunday rundown


WE Sunday Feature

August 31, 2014 | NPR · Immigration remains one of the most challenging issues for President Obama. Political correspondent Mara Liasson discusses the political cost of the choices before him with Linda Wertheimer.
 

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

New Mexico

Jun 25, 2013 — Nearly a quarter of all public school kids are Latino, but only 3 percent of kids' books are by or about Latinos. There's a similar dearth of Native American, black and Asian characters. Why? One editor says librarians, with their high demand for multicultural books, don't drive best-seller lists.
Launch in player | Comments |
Sep 30, 2012 — Susan Isaacs' latest novel revolves around Gloria Garrison, a 79-year-old CEO with a multimillion-dollar makeover business. Isaacs says her female characters don't need to be likable, but they should "fight for something beyond themselves."
Launch in player | Comments |
Apr 23, 2011 — Philip Connors worked in Manhattan for years before he got the itch to get out. So he went way out — to a lookout tower in the Gila National Desert in New Mexico. He talks to Scott Simon about the gorgeous, jewel-toned views and why the solitary lifestyle speaks to him.
Launch in player | Comments |
Apr 5, 2011 — The life of French chanteuse Edith Piaf; Tina Fey's hilarious book of zingers; the untold story of Julia and Paul Child in the OSS; and a quiet meditation on the desert wilderness from 10,000 feet above sea level.
Comments |
Nov 11, 2010 — Native-Americans have been influential in the U.S. military for more than 200 years. They assisted George Washington, served during the War of 1812 and have continued to defend the country into the 21st century.
Launch in player | Comments |
Jun 1, 2010 — Photojournalist Steven Clevenger has been covering wars for almost four decades — from his early days in Cambodia, to Iraq and Afghanistan. In 2006, Clevenger began documenting the role of Native American soldiers in the war in Iraq. His book is called America's First Warriors.
Launch in player | Comments |
Oct 8, 2008 — An internal Justice Department investigation has concluded that the controversial U.S. attorney firings of 2006 were of a partisan political nature. One of the seven fired attorneys, Iglesias discusses his book, In Justice, an insider's account of the affair.
Launch in player | Comments |
Jul 6, 2006 — Julia Glass, the acclaimed author of Three Junes, talks with Lynn Neary about her new novel, The Whole World Over. Glass says she stopped writing her book when the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks occured. Then she incorporated the event into her story when she felt compelled to start writing again.
Launch in player | Comments |
more New Mexico from NPR