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August 28, 2014 | NPR · For the first time, researchers have tracked the spread of Ebola, almost in real time, during an outbreak. The virus is quickly changing its genetic code. But it's unclear what the mutations mean.
 
August 29, 2014 | NPR · French President Francois Hollande is under pressure to fix the country's economy, which is overburdened by regulation and failing a generation of young people. He's also facing calls for austerity.
 
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August 29, 2014 | NPR · Congressman and former Republican vice presidential nominee Paul Ryan discusses his new book, The Way Forward: Renewing the American Idea.
 

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August 28, 2014 | NPR · The pay is generous — $1,000 a month. The risks are enormous. They collect the body of an Ebola victim, avoiding any contact that could infect them. They wear safety garb. And they pray.
 
August 28, 2014 | NPR · The Syrian civil war has flared up in the south of the country, near the Israeli border. A group of Islamist fighters have now captured a border crossing between Syria and Israel on the Golan Heights.
 
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August 28, 2014 | NPR · The protests following Michael Brown's death have rekindled long-standing complaints about racist policing in the St. Louis area. Cops there are now becoming more outspoken in their own defense.
 

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August 23, 2014 | NPR · Nearly 1,500 people have died in the Ebola outbreak, and more nations in the region are closing their borders. NPR's Scott Simon speaks to Africa correspondent Ofeibea Quist-Arcton about the epidemic.
 

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August 24, 2014 | NPR · In the wake of violent clashes between protesters and police in Ferguson, Mo., President Obama is ordering a review of the federal programs that help local police departments purchase military gear.
 

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Shakespeare, William

Nov 20, 2013 — On Tuesday night, finalists for the National Book Awards read from their nominated works at The New School in New York City. The National Book Foundation will announce the winners Wednesday night.
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Feb 22, 2012 — This week brings the final installment in Stieg Larsson's Girl With the Dragon Tattoo series, a send-up of Nabokov and Shakespeare by Arthur Phillips, and a spiritual fantasy by Kevin Brockmeier. In nonfiction, physicist Michio Kaku peers into the future, and Stephen Hawking regards the universe's grand design.
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Aug 17, 2011 — For those readers looking to exercise their brains while lounging by the pool, this summer has some great reading options. These five engaging books are witty, smart and, best of all, a lot of fun.
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Jul 14, 2011 — NPR coverage of The Tragedy of Arthur by Arthur Phillips. News, author interviews, critics' picks and more.
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Apr 23, 2011The Tragedy of Arthur, the new novel by Arthur Phillips, tells the story of a con man, his son and an undiscovered work by William Shakespeare. Phillips speaks to Scott Simon about fraud and family drama.
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Apr 19, 2011 — Taking a page from Nabokov's Pale Fire, Arthur Phillips' new novel The Tragedy of Arthur presents a "long-lost" Shakespearean play, along with a foreword by a less-than-convinced narrator, also named Arthur Phillips. The playful conceit leads to a ribald, wily debate about authenticity and delusion.
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Jun 19, 2010 — In 1795, a young man named William-Henry Ireland signed a tattered piece of paper "Wm Shakespeare." It was the first of hundreds of documents that he forged and passed off as William Shakespeare originals. Doug Stewart tells his story in The Boy Who Would Be Shakespeare.
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May 20, 2010 — In Kill Shakespeare, Conor McCreery and Anthony Del Col's graphic novel, the Bard's heroes and villains conspire to track down the evil wizard, William Shakespeare. The series brings all of Shakespeare's trademarks to its panels — action, drama, lust, violence, double-crossing and cross-dressing.
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May 20, 2009 — First published 400 years ago, Shakespeare's sonnets might never have been put to press had it been left to the author to decide things. As writer Clinton Heylin explains, Shakespeare's sonnets were never intended for a wide audience.
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Jul 2, 2008 — Shakespeare's works inspire strong emotions both on stage and off. Author Nigel Cliff talks about his book The Shakespeare Riots: Revenge, Drama and Death in 19th-Century America, which tells the story of an argument between two actors that led to a deadly riot.
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