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August 1, 2014 | NPR · Renee Montagne talks with the head of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Dr. Thomas Frieden, for the latest news about the Ebola outbreak in West Africa.
 
August 1, 2014 | NPR · CIA director John Brennan apologized to Sen. Dianne Feinstein, who had accused the CIA of spying on her committee's computers. Brennan at first denied it.
 
August 1, 2014 | NPR · It's one of the most popular items, but often it seems to be as far as humanly possible from the entrance. The Planet Money team looks at two very different theories about why that is.
 

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August 1, 2014 | NPR · House Republicans are delaying their August recess, sticking around Washington to try passing a bill meant to address the border crisis. Democrats and President Obama have already voiced their opposition to the bill on the table.
 
August 1, 2014 | NPR · Regular political commentators, E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and David Brooks of The New York Times, discuss the beleaguered border bill in the House and the shattered cease-fire in Gaza.
 
August 1, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Gaza took an ominous turn Friday, as a 72-hour humanitarian cease-fire fell apart within 90 minutes and the Israeli military announced its belief that one of its soldiers was captured by Hamas militants.
 

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July 26, 2014 | NPR · Hezbollah has been a longtime ally of Hamas, but during this most recent conflict between Israel and Gaza they've taken a sideline role. NPR's Scott Simon talks to the BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut.
 

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July 27, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Ukraine near the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 has international investigators staying away. NPR's Arun Rath talks with OSCE's Michael Bociurkiw about the investigation.
 

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Shakespeare, William

Nov 20, 2013 — On Tuesday night, finalists for the National Book Awards read from their nominated works at The New School in New York City. The National Book Foundation will announce the winners Wednesday night.
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Feb 22, 2012 — This week brings the final installment in Stieg Larsson's Girl With the Dragon Tattoo series, a send-up of Nabokov and Shakespeare by Arthur Phillips, and a spiritual fantasy by Kevin Brockmeier. In nonfiction, physicist Michio Kaku peers into the future, and Stephen Hawking regards the universe's grand design.
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Aug 17, 2011 — For those readers looking to exercise their brains while lounging by the pool, this summer has some great reading options. These five engaging books are witty, smart and, best of all, a lot of fun.
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Jul 14, 2011 — NPR coverage of The Tragedy of Arthur by Arthur Phillips. News, author interviews, critics' picks and more.
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Apr 23, 2011The Tragedy of Arthur, the new novel by Arthur Phillips, tells the story of a con man, his son and an undiscovered work by William Shakespeare. Phillips speaks to Scott Simon about fraud and family drama.
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Apr 19, 2011 — Taking a page from Nabokov's Pale Fire, Arthur Phillips' new novel The Tragedy of Arthur presents a "long-lost" Shakespearean play, along with a foreword by a less-than-convinced narrator, also named Arthur Phillips. The playful conceit leads to a ribald, wily debate about authenticity and delusion.
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Jun 19, 2010 — In 1795, a young man named William-Henry Ireland signed a tattered piece of paper "Wm Shakespeare." It was the first of hundreds of documents that he forged and passed off as William Shakespeare originals. Doug Stewart tells his story in The Boy Who Would Be Shakespeare.
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May 20, 2010 — In Kill Shakespeare, Conor McCreery and Anthony Del Col's graphic novel, the Bard's heroes and villains conspire to track down the evil wizard, William Shakespeare. The series brings all of Shakespeare's trademarks to its panels — action, drama, lust, violence, double-crossing and cross-dressing.
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May 20, 2009 — First published 400 years ago, Shakespeare's sonnets might never have been put to press had it been left to the author to decide things. As writer Clinton Heylin explains, Shakespeare's sonnets were never intended for a wide audience.
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Jul 2, 2008 — Shakespeare's works inspire strong emotions both on stage and off. Author Nigel Cliff talks about his book The Shakespeare Riots: Revenge, Drama and Death in 19th-Century America, which tells the story of an argument between two actors that led to a deadly riot.
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