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August 28, 2014 | NPR · For the first time, researchers have tracked the spread of Ebola, almost in real time, during an outbreak. The virus is quickly changing its genetic code. But it's unclear what the mutations mean.
 
August 29, 2014 | NPR · French President Francois Hollande is under pressure to fix the country's economy, which is overburdened by regulation and failing a generation of young people. He's also facing calls for austerity.
 
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August 29, 2014 | NPR · Congressman and former Republican vice presidential nominee Paul Ryan discusses his new book, The Way Forward: Renewing the American Idea.
 

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August 29, 2014 | NPR · As the Obama administration develops a strategy for fighting the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria, several members of Congress say they want buy-in.
 
August 29, 2014 | NPR · Regular political commentators, E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and David Brooks of The New York Times, discuss the latest in Ukraine and the actions of ISIS in Iraq and Syria.
 
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August 29, 2014 | NPR · An earthquake in Napa Valley this week brought back old fears for author Gustavo Arellano. In his anxiety he's revisiting the book, A Crack in the Edge of the World.
 

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August 23, 2014 | NPR · Nearly 1,500 people have died in the Ebola outbreak, and more nations in the region are closing their borders. NPR's Scott Simon speaks to Africa correspondent Ofeibea Quist-Arcton about the epidemic.
 

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August 24, 2014 | NPR · In the wake of violent clashes between protesters and police in Ferguson, Mo., President Obama is ordering a review of the federal programs that help local police departments purchase military gear.
 

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Women journalists

Oct 15, 2013 — In 1931, Harry Powers killed two women and three children at his home in Quiet Dell, W.Va. Writer Jayne Anne Phillips learned about the murders from her mother, who was a child when the deaths became a media sensation. Phillips' new novel retells the tragedy through the eyes of a young reporter.
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Sep 9, 2013 — In softcover nonfiction, Walter Isaacson records Steve Jobs' official biography, Salman Rushdie remembers hiding for his life and Lynn Povich describes a revolution at Newsweek. In fiction, Michael Chabon tells the story of a struggling California record store and Junot Diaz explores infidelity.
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Sep 5, 2013 — Do recent events have you wishing for more insight into Syria? Critic Marcela Valdes — with some help from experts on the region — recommends five great reads. From the diaries of a threatened novelist to a study of Syrian lingerie, these books reveal new facets of a complex country.
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Jun 18, 2013 — Mary Louise Kelly used to cover national security for NPR, but lately she's turned her attention to fiction. Her new novel, Anonymous Sources, draws on Kelly's own reporting experiences, including things she couldn't say when she was a journalist.
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Sep 12, 2012 — The Daily Beast and Newsweek editor explores the changing role of women with recommendations that cover a groundbreaking gender discrimination lawsuit against Newsweek, a stay-at-home wife's rise through the professional ranks and the meaning behind a mother's profile picture.
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Sep 9, 2012 — In the 1960s, Lynn Povich was part of a revolution at Newsweek that changed women's roles in news organizations. Her new book, The Good Girls Revolt, describes how she recruited women in bathrooms to sue management. She tells NPR that even today, "vigilance is necessary."
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Aug 17, 2012 — The veteran journalist, who was married to news anchor Peter Jennings and then the diplomat Richard Holbrooke, recounts the highs and lows of her life with the two men.
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Jul 3, 2012 — Passing along a book that no one has heard of is like telling a really good secret. NPR's Barrie Hardymon recommends a hot Southern thriller, a scathing evisceration of the newspaper biz, a slightly ridiculous, totally gratifying romance, and one extra gem that's been hiding in plain sight.
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Apr 25, 2012 — Kevin Wilson's "strange and wonderful" debut novel, The Family Fang, arrives, along with Adrian Burgos Jr.'s biography of a colorful Negro League owner, memoirs by hacker Kevin Mitnick and mother of nine Melissa Faye Greene, plus journalist Doug Saunders' look at world migration patterns.
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Apr 13, 2011 — Melissa Fay Greene, author of Praying for Sheetrock, weaves another pursuit around writing award-winning journalism: raising her nine children. Her new book shares the story of adopting and raising a family, since she felt "most thickly in the cumbersome richness of life with children underfoot."
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