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April 21, 2014 | NPR · More than 200 people remain missing after the ferry capsized last week. One family was told their daughter was dead instead of missing. It turns out authorities had confused her for another girl.
 
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April 21, 2014 | NPR · The U.S. mainland's only Asian-majority congressional district sits in California's Silicon Valley, where two Indian-American candidates are trying to oust Japanese-American Congressman Mike Honda.
 
April 21, 2014 | NPR · Hamid Mir, one of Pakistan's most famous journalists, was shot and wounded by gunmen as he was driving down a busy street in Karachi. It's the second such attack this month on a journalist.
 

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April 20, 2014 | NPR · California farmers produce an enormous proportion of American produce, but the state is now experiencing a record-breaking drought that is being felt throughout the state and the U.S.
 
April 20, 2014 | NPR · It's been a grim Easter Sunday in South Korea as the death toll continues to rise from the ferry disaster that left nearly 300 passengers, many of them high school students, dead or missing.
 
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April 20, 2014 | WBUR · Newlyweds Jessica Kensky and Patrick Downes each lost a leg in the Boston Marathon bombing. Rescue the assistance dog helps fetch keys and push buttons, bringing warmth and joy as the couple recovers.
 

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April 19, 2014 | NPR · The search continues for hundreds of people, mostly students, who were on board a South Korean ferry when it sank this week. Correspondent Anthony Kuhn shares the latest with NPR's Wade Goodwyn.
 

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April 20, 2014 | NPR · Monday is the 2014 Boston Marathon. Security will be tight, and this year's race will be an emotional event that will be about more than who wins.
 

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Women journalists

Oct 15, 2013 — In 1931, Harry Powers killed two women and three children at his home in Quiet Dell, W.Va. Writer Jayne Anne Phillips learned about the murders from her mother, who was a child when the deaths became a media sensation. Phillips' new novel retells the tragedy through the eyes of a young reporter.
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Sep 9, 2013 — In softcover nonfiction, Walter Isaacson records Steve Jobs' official biography, Salman Rushdie remembers hiding for his life and Lynn Povich describes a revolution at Newsweek. In fiction, Michael Chabon tells the story of a struggling California record store and Junot Diaz explores infidelity.
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Sep 5, 2013 — Do recent events have you wishing for more insight into Syria? Critic Marcela Valdes — with some help from experts on the region — recommends five great reads. From the diaries of a threatened novelist to a study of Syrian lingerie, these books reveal new facets of a complex country.
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Jun 18, 2013 — Mary Louise Kelly used to cover national security for NPR, but lately she's turned her attention to fiction. Her new novel, Anonymous Sources, draws on Kelly's own reporting experiences, including things she couldn't say when she was a journalist.
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Sep 12, 2012 — The Daily Beast and Newsweek editor explores the changing role of women with recommendations that cover a groundbreaking gender discrimination lawsuit against Newsweek, a stay-at-home wife's rise through the professional ranks and the meaning behind a mother's profile picture.
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Sep 9, 2012 — In the 1960s, Lynn Povich was part of a revolution at Newsweek that changed women's roles in news organizations. Her new book, The Good Girls Revolt, describes how she recruited women in bathrooms to sue management. She tells NPR that even today, "vigilance is necessary."
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Aug 17, 2012 — The veteran journalist, who was married to news anchor Peter Jennings and then the diplomat Richard Holbrooke, recounts the highs and lows of her life with the two men.
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Jul 3, 2012 — Passing along a book that no one has heard of is like telling a really good secret. NPR's Barrie Hardymon recommends a hot Southern thriller, a scathing evisceration of the newspaper biz, a slightly ridiculous, totally gratifying romance, and one extra gem that's been hiding in plain sight.
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Apr 25, 2012 — Kevin Wilson's "strange and wonderful" debut novel, The Family Fang, arrives, along with Adrian Burgos Jr.'s biography of a colorful Negro League owner, memoirs by hacker Kevin Mitnick and mother of nine Melissa Faye Greene, plus journalist Doug Saunders' look at world migration patterns.
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Apr 13, 2011 — Melissa Fay Greene, author of Praying for Sheetrock, weaves another pursuit around writing award-winning journalism: raising her nine children. Her new book shares the story of adopting and raising a family, since she felt "most thickly in the cumbersome richness of life with children underfoot."
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