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April 16, 2014 | NPR · Schoolgirls were kidnapped in Nigeria Tuesday. The suspects are believed to be with a radical group blamed for a bombing Monday. Kelly McEvers talks to Michelle Faul of The Associated Press.
 
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April 16, 2014 | NPR · Fans and foes want to know whether the Affordable Care Act is meeting its goals. But, for good reasons, there are no clear answers yet.
 
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April 16, 2014 | NPR · A year after the Boston Marathon bombing, Heather Abbott has adapted to life with her prostheses, including a blade for running and one that allows her to wear her favorite shoes.
 

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April 16, 2014 | NPR · Ukrainian tanks arrived in the city of Kramatorsk Wednesday morning. By the time they rolled out of the city, they were flying Russian flags. People in Kramatorsk tell the story of what happened.
 
April 16, 2014 | NPR · NATO has announced a strengthening of its forces near the alliance's eastern border. Gen. George Joulwan, the former NATO supreme allied commander for Europe, discusses the plan.
 
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April 16, 2014 | NPR · A 325 million-year-old fossil find shows that the gill structures of modern sharks are actually quite different from their ancient ancestors.
 

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April 12, 2014 | NPR · As pro-Russia demonstrators continue their tense standoff in Eastern Ukraine, police are conspicuously absent from city streets.
 

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April 13, 2014 | NPR · As the anniversary of last year's marathon bombing approaches, NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with correspondent Carrie Johnson about the investigation and legal wrangling yet to come.
 

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Europe

Nov 12, 2013 — In softcover fiction, Katherine Marsh searches the heavens for a teenage dwarf's destiny and Juliann Garey approaches a bipolar life from three different angles. In softcover nonfiction, Jeff Speck paces the city streets and Ezekiel Emanuel reflects on the family life of three brothers with a few sharp angles of their own.
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Jul 24, 2013 — In his book, which has just won the Hessell-Tiltman Prize for History, Keith Lowe describes a land with no governments, schools, banks or shops, where rape was rampant and women prostituted themselves for food. Flying in the face of usual post-WWII narratives, Lowe sheds light on a complex history.
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Jul 5, 2013 — At No. 15, Alan Furst's Mission to Paris features a film star unwittingly involved with fascists.
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Jun 21, 2013 — At No. 11, Ben MacIntyre's Double Cross tells of the D-Day spies who deceived Nazi intelligence.
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May 13, 2013 — In softcover nonfiction, Tom Reiss explores the inspiration for The Count of Monte Cristo, Ben MacIntyre depicts a World War II effort to fool the Nazis, and Justin Lee recounts his struggle for acceptance as a gay Christian. In fiction, Dennis Lehane imagines a Prohibition-era mobster.
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Jan 25, 2013 — Edmund De Waal's The Hare With Amber Eyes returns to the list at No. 15.
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Jan 14, 2013 — Though former MI5 director Stella Rimington knows better than anyone that Ian Fleming's From Russia With Love is not a realistic portrayal of life in the intelligence services, she still loves this tale of sex and violence. Which is your favorite Bond book? Tell us in the comments.
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Dec 17, 2012 — If the conspiracy theorists are right, we only have a few more days before the end of the world. Author Ben H. Winters describes his favorite pre-apocalyptic works of fiction. Do you have a favorite doomsday masterpiece? Tell us in the comments.
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Nov 10, 2012 — In her latest novel for young adults, Jepp Who Defied the Stars, author Katherine Marsh tells the coming-of-age story of a young royal court dwarf who decides to steal his fate back from the stars and instead write his own future.
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Oct 26, 2012 — Barzun authored dozens of books and essays on everything from philosophy to music to baseball. He died Thursday, just one month shy of his 105th birthday. "I don't know anybody who had such a Renaissance mind," says his friend and colleague, Prof. Henry Graff.
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