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August 19, 2014 | NPR · More than one week after the shooting death of an unarmed black teenager in a St. Louis suburb, protests continue. On Monday night, police fired tear gas and stun grenades to disperse demonstrators.
 
August 19, 2014 | NPR · The actions in Ferguson, Mo., have inspired talk about the militarization of U.S. police departments. The real question, is whether police have become militarized in their attitude toward the public.
 
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August 19, 2014 | KHN · Across the U.S., jails hold many more people with serious mental illness than state hospitals do. San Antonio is reweaving its safety net for the mentally ill — and saving $10 million annually.
 

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August 19, 2014 | NPR · Dr. Joanne Liu of Doctors Without Borders says fear and a lack of sense of urgency has kept the international community in their home countries rather than stepping up to the plate in West Africa.
 
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August 19, 2014 | NPR · The type of Ebola erupting in West Africa is closely related to one found 2,500 miles away — the distance between Boston and San Francisco. How did the virus spread so far without anyone noticing?
 
August 19, 2014 | NPR · Iranian poet and women's rights advocate Simin Behbahani has died. Her work probed the social and political challenges that faced Iran after its Islamic Revolution. She was 87.
 

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August 16, 2014 | NPR · Both Ukraine and Russia say they're trying to send supplies to residents in eastern Ukraine. But with tensions on both sides running high, that aid may take a while to arrive.
 

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August 17, 2014 | NPR · American fighter jets and drones carried out airstrikes against Islamist targets near the Mosul Dam in northern Iraq on Saturday. A breach of the dam could threaten entire cities.
 

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Bronx (New York, N.Y.)

Dec 29, 2011 — Abraham Verghese's Cutting for Stone has been on the list for 100 weeks. The novel tells the story of a secret love affair between an Indian nun and a British surgeon in Addis Ababa, and their twin boys, Marion and Shiva Stone.
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Dec 16, 2011Cutting For Stone — a family saga set in tumultuous Ethiopia — is on the list for a 98th week.
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Jul 14, 2011 — NPR coverage of Cutting for Stone by Abraham Verghese. News, author interviews, critics' picks and more.
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Apr 7, 2011 — As a culmination of our March NPR Book Club reading of Cutting for Stone, we spoke to author Abraham Verghese, a doctor and writer, about his bestselling novel.
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Mar 8, 2011 — Throughout the month of March, NPR Books will be running an online discussion about Abraham Verghese's novel Cutting For Stone. Find out how you can take part in the club, both on the Web and in your community.
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Dec 15, 2009 — What makes a good book-club selection? Most of Lynn Neary's picks are quick reads. All are fiction. And, because some of the best conversations occur when people don't agree, a few are calculated to spark debate. So have a glass of wine, maybe a bite to eat, and let the discussions begin.
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Nov 17, 2009 — The history of literature is filled with authors who also performed surgery or scribbled prescriptions. Lynn Neary speaks with two doctors who are also fiction writers — Abraham Verghese and Terrence Holt — about the link between medicine and writing literature.
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Mar 10, 2009 — Excerpt: 'Cutting for Stone'
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Mar 10, 2009 — Physician Abraham Verghese's debut novel, Cutting for Stone, is a big, sprawling story of an Ethiopian surgeon, his family and his craft. The author is best known for his memoir My Own Country.
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Feb 27, 2007 — With a combination of toughness and tenderness, professor Sam Freedman guides his students at Columbia University's School of Journalism down the path of narrative nonfiction. Often, the destination is a book deal.
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