Latest News from NPR

on:

NCPR is supported by:

 
Hourly Newscast
4 min., 45 sec.

Programs

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Latest Features:
July 25, 2014 | NPR · Steve Inskeep talks with Honduran Foreign Minister Mireya Aguero de Corrales, who's in Washington to help find a solution to the thousands of Central American children arriving at the U.S. border.
 
July 25, 2014 | WBUR · Massachusetts is offering to house hundreds of unaccompanied minors who've been detained crossing the U.S.-Mexico border. One of the proposed sites is on Cape Cod, but residents are blasting the plan.
 
July 25, 2014 | NPR · The novels of John le Carre have been reliable sources of compelling cinema. The new adaptation of "A Most Wanted Man" stars Philip Seymour Hoffman in one of his last roles.
 

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Latest Features:
July 27, 2014 | NPR · Israel and Hamas carried out a rhetorical battle Sunday over the fate of dueling offers to extend a ceasefire. In the end, the fighting resumed after Saturday's 12-hour truce. Israel vowed to continue its military campaign, targeting tunnels along the border. Wary Gazans prepared as best they could for the feast that marks the end of Ramadan.
 
July 27, 2014 | NPR · Anne Barnard from The New York Times talks with NPR's Eric Westervelt about the differences between the current explosion of violence in Gaza and previous ones.
 
Courtesy of Silverstone Auction
July 27, 2014 | NPR · The Harrier Jump Jet is known for vertical take-offs and landings. It also has an accident-prone track record, but that didn't dissuade one pilot from buying his dream plane.
 

Latest Saturday rundown




WE Saturday Feature

July 26, 2014 | NPR · Hezbollah has been a longtime ally of Hamas, but during this most recent conflict between Israel and Gaza they've taken a sideline role. NPR's Scott Simon talks to the BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut.
 

Latest Sunday rundown


WE Sunday Feature

July 27, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Ukraine near the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 has international investigators staying away. NPR's Arun Rath talks with OSCE's Michael Bociurkiw about the investigation.
 

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Popular works

Apr 11, 2014 — In Gulp, which appears at No. 5, Mary Roach follows the digestive system from the mouth to the south.
Comments |
Mar 14, 2014 — With books like Stiff and Spook, Roach has built a reputation for making unpalatable subjects entertaining. In Gulp, she tackles the human digestive system, from the mouth on down.
Launch in player | Comments |
Nov 25, 2013 — In softcover fiction, Joyce Carol Oates wreaks karmic horror on turn-of-the-century Princeton, and Sebastian Faulks braids five lives in the search for what makes a self. In softcover nonfiction, Elton John tells the story of his crusade for better AIDS treatment, and Bernard Lewis maps the Middle East with a life's worth of anecdotes.
Comments |
Aug 27, 2013 — George Johnson's The Cancer Chronicles was inspired by his wife's battle with uterine cancer. It traces the history of the disease back to the very first tumor ever discovered — in a dinosaur bone. Reviewer John Wilwol says Johnson "writes clearly and colorfully without dumbing down his material."
Comments |
Aug 12, 2013 — Spring comes, then summer, fall and winter and if you are off the planet with a camera looking down at Earth, the seasons seem like breaths. Speed up the imagery, and the planet seems to pulse, like a living thing. Take a look at what designer John Nelson has done. It's uncanny.
Comments |
Apr 12, 2013 — In Gulp, which debuts at No. 2, Mary Roach takes readers on a tour through the digestive system.
Comments |
Nov 30, 2012 — You can go to almost any cubic foot of ocean, stream, coral, backyard, ice shelves even, and if you look, you'll find scores of little animals and plants busy making a living. But here's a place — a beautiful, bountiful place — that when you look close — is a desert.
Comments |
Oct 30, 2012 — In the long run, geoengineering — tinkering with air, oceans, the skies — will help us survive on a changing planet. More and more eminent scientists agree that if the human race survives, the engineers will get smarter, the tools will get better, and one day we will control the climate. But should we?
Comments |
Sep 27, 2012 — Frances Ashcroft's new book details how electricity in the body fuels everything we think, feel or do. She tells Fresh Air about discovering a new protein, how scientists are like novelists and how she wanted to be a farmer's wife.
Launch in player | Comments |
Sep 25, 2012 — The traditional mother-daughter dynamic turned on its head for New York Times columnist Alex Witchel in the wake of her mother's struggle with dementia. But Witchel's memoir, despite its raw honesty, fails to provide the depth needed to make it a standout in a trendy genre.
Comments |
more Popular works from NPR