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April 24, 2014 | NPR · Hundreds of civilians have been massacred in the South Sudan town of Bentiu. For more, Steve Inskeep talks to Andrew Green, the South Sudan bureau chief for the Voice of America.
 
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April 24, 2014 | NPR · One year ago, a factory building in Bangladesh collapsed, killing more than 1,100 workers. Top retailers have begun inspecting factories more aggressively, but other steps have fallen short.
 
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April 24, 2014 | NPR · Some of the factors keeping low-income students from getting into college aren't always obvious to the public, higher education insiders tell Morning Edition's David Greene.
 

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April 24, 2014 | NPR · Syria will likely meet an upcoming deadline to hand over its declared chemical weapons. But the agreement seems to have emboldened the Syrian regime to use other brutal tactics, including a chemical not covered by the deal.
 
April 24, 2014 | NPR · As diplomatic talks in Geneva have failed to resolve the three-year-old civil war in Syria, the U.S. is undertaking a new covert program to send weapons in support of rebel forces there.
 
April 24, 2014 | NPR · The Israeli government suspended peace talks with Palestinians, citing a unity agreement announced Wednesday by Palestinian leadership. The Israeli security cabinet came to the decision unanimously, angered by Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas's decision to end a seven-year schism with the Hamas movement.
 

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April 19, 2014 | NPR · The search continues for hundreds of people, mostly students, who were on board a South Korean ferry when it sank this week. Correspondent Anthony Kuhn shares the latest with NPR's Wade Goodwyn.
 

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April 20, 2014 | NPR · Monday is the 2014 Boston Marathon. Security will be tight, and this year's race will be an emotional event that will be about more than who wins.
 

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Pennsylvania

Dec 4, 2013 — NPR staff and critics selected more than 200 standout titles. Now it's up to you: Choose your own adventure! Use our tags to search through books and find the perfect read for yourself or someone else.
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Oct 7, 2013 — In softcover fiction, Will Self spelunks the depths of consciousness in a mental hospital; Amity Gaige divulges an East German immigrant's secrets; Cristina Garcia defines the space that separates a dictator from an exile; and Ayana Mathis follows the life of a mother during the Great Migration.
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Jun 6, 2013 — For readers in search of tales that step outside familiar viewpoints, these authors unravel conflict, religion, race and love — from new and different angles. In these novels, a child from the slums, an executed zealot, a reluctant immigrant, a guilty survivor and a suffering mother take center stage.
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Dec 21, 2012 — Ayana Mathis' Twelve Tribes Of Hattie is a tale of adversity and resilience. It debuts at No. 10.
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Dec 11, 2012 — Oprah Winfrey's second pick for her rebooted book club is The Twelve Tribes of Hattie, by first-time novelist Ayana Mathis. It's a chronicle of the Great Migration of African-Americans leaving the rural South, following a family matriarch who leaves Georgia to start a new life in Philadelphia.
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Jul 2, 2012 — Author Solomon Jones says death can seem angelic at first — especially to the lost, addicted kids in his book The Last Confession. He says many of his stories come from his own experiences as a homeless drug addict on the streets of Philadelphia.
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Oct 31, 2011 — Looking for something thoughtful to go along with your Halloween thrills? Author Lisa Tucker recommends three page-turners that will make you feel scarily smart.
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Apr 4, 2011 — Every day, Americans of different races pass on sidewalks, barely acknowledging one another. But Elijah Anderson, author of Cosmopolitan Canopy: Race and Civility in Everyday Life, says even highly segregated cities harbor spaces that enable all kinds of people to interact.
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Dec 20, 2010 — Founding Father Robert Morris was a laissez-faire capitalist and subject of perhaps the first American congressional inquiry. In Robert Morris: Financier of the American Revolution, author Charles Rappleye argues that the war couldn't have been won without him.
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Oct 24, 2010 — Octavius Catto led the fight to desegregate Philadelphia's horse-drawn streetcars, raised all-black regiments to fight in the Civil War, and pushed for black voting rights — all before the age of 32. Despite all that, he's barely remembered today. But a new book sheds life on his groundbreaking work.
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