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July 29, 2014 | NPR · House and Senate negotiators reached a compromise, $17 billion agreement to improve medical care for veterans. The deal comes in the final week before Congress leaves town for a monthlong recess.
 
July 29, 2014 | NPR · Washington Post reporter Liz Sly tells Renee Montagne that U.S. arms may be flowing to moderate Syrian rebels, but the aid seems to be too little too late to affect the course of the civil war.
 
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July 28, 2014 | NPR · The militant group threatens to kill parents who immunize their children. As a result, polio has come roaring back in Pakistan. Eradication now hinges on whether the country can control the virus.
 

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July 29, 2014 | KERA · After caring for Ebola patients for several months in West Africa, Dr. Kent Brantly noticed last week that he had symptoms. The 33-year-old immediately put himself into a Liberian isolation ward.
 
July 29, 2014 | NPR · Virologist Thomas Geisbert has spent decades studying Ebola and other hemorrhagic fevers. He speaks to Audie Cornish about the current Ebola outbreak, the worst in history, and how it might be contained this time around.
 
July 29, 2014 | NPR · The Eid festival, which celebrates the end of Ramadan, serves as a time for visiting relatives and exchanging gifts. But one family's holiday in Gaza traces the death and displacement wrought by the war between Hamas and Israel.
 

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July 26, 2014 | NPR · Hezbollah has been a longtime ally of Hamas, but during this most recent conflict between Israel and Gaza they've taken a sideline role. NPR's Scott Simon talks to the BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut.
 

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July 27, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Ukraine near the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 has international investigators staying away. NPR's Arun Rath talks with OSCE's Michael Bociurkiw about the investigation.
 

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Ethnic relations

Nov 23, 2013 — The island village of Patchogue, N.Y., appears to be an all-American suburb. But in 2008, it was the site of a brutal murder that left residents struggling to reconcile deep-rooted issues of racism and hatred with the town's idyllic appearance.
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Jul 28, 2013 — Najla Said's father, Edward Said, was an outspoken professor and prominent voice for Palestinian independence. Yet Najla's life felt less grounded. Growing up as a Palestinian-Lebanese-American in New York City, she balanced competing cultures and multiple lives, searching for a place to fit in.
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Dec 12, 2012 — Author Wendy Welch shares her favorite book about small-town life that defy stereotypes. What is your favorite work that takes a bite out of literary tradition? Tell us in the comments.
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Jul 5, 2012 — In fiction, Erin Morgenstern conjures star-crossed magicians, Rachel DeWoskin revisits the horrors of high school, and Dean Bakopoulos' widower pursues new love. In nonfiction, James Carroll visits the real and imagined Jerusalem.
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Jul 15, 2011 — NPR coverage of The Inheritance of Loss by Kiran Desai. News, author interviews, critics' picks and more.
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Apr 4, 2011 — Every day, Americans of different races pass on sidewalks, barely acknowledging one another. But Elijah Anderson, author of Cosmopolitan Canopy: Race and Civility in Everyday Life, says even highly segregated cities harbor spaces that enable all kinds of people to interact.
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Mar 12, 2011 — Jerusalem has many identities — some real, some imagined. It's known as "the city of peace," but author James Carroll identifies it as the "home base of religious violence." In his new book Jerusalem, Jerusalem, Carroll traces the history of this holy city and how it has shaped the modern world.
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Dec 16, 2010 — Two things are shared in common by the five thrilling books that make up Granta editor John Freeman's list of the best debuts of 2010: A chaos that reflects dark times and an urgency to tell these mysterious stories — from East Africa, South America, Kashmir, New Jersey — with clarity and beauty.
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May 29, 2009 — Renowned scholar and college professor Ronald Takaki has died at the age of 70 after committing suicide. Takaki began his teaching career at the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA), where he is remembered for being the school's first professor of African-American studies. Larry Hajime Shinagawa, a professor at the University of Maryland, remembers his close friend and mentor.
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Dec 27, 2008 — The Bielski brothers gave shelter and protection to Polish Jews who, like them, fled into the region's forests and swamps to escape German persecution. Director Edward Zwick's new film tells their story, but why hasn't it been heard until now?
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