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September 1, 2014 | NPR · A Guinean student in the Senegalese capital of Dakar has tested positive for the deadly disease. David Greene talks to Krista Larson, West Africa correspondent for the Associated Press.
 
September 1, 2014 | NPR · Protesters surrounded Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif's home, and for a brief period forced government TV off the air. Steve Inskeep talks to Jon Boone, a correspondent for The Guardian in Islamabad.
 
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September 1, 2014 | NPR · A widely watched video shows a foreigner fainting on a subway car and everyone around him fleeing. No one helps. It's rekindled a national debate about trust, fear and the Chinese national character.
 

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September 1, 2014 | NPR · Ebola has exposed weaknesses in Africa's health networks and a failure to work together to arrest the spread of the virus. The "not our problem" response is taking an economic toll on the continent.
 
September 1, 2014 | NPR · Nearly 260 health workers in West Africa have been infected, and 134 have died. Dr. Robert Garry of Tulane University, who worked with five who died, discusses the devastation in the community.
 
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September 1, 2014 | NPR · Ads with candidates shooting guns are proliferating this year. It can all be traced back to Sen. Joe Manchin's famed 2010 spot "Dead Aim."
 

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August 30, 2014 | NPR · Ukrainian forces are defending the port city of Novoazovsk from what they say is a Russian invasion. Scott Simon talks to correspondent Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson.
 

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August 31, 2014 | NPR · Immigration remains one of the most challenging issues for President Obama. Political correspondent Mara Liasson discusses the political cost of the choices before him with Linda Wertheimer.
 

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Meg Wolitzer

Mar 20, 2014 — Also: A Q&A with Wolitzer; author behind the @GSElevator account gets a new book deal; Matt Seidel mocks the writerly trope of beginning essays with "There are two kinds of novelists ..."
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Feb 18, 2014 — Meg Wolitzer's novel is about lifelong friendship tinged with jealousy. It begins at a summer camp in 1974 and follows a group of friends through middle age. Wolitzer says her teen years were a rehearsal for her adult life and that today she is "different" but "in the same shell."
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Dec 4, 2013 — NPR staff and critics selected more than 200 standout titles. Now it's up to you: Choose your own adventure! Use our tags to search through books and find the perfect read for yourself or someone else.
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Sep 7, 2013 — Media outlets are full of stories about whether women can "have it all." After becoming a mother, Curtis Sittenfeld came to appreciate novels and memoirs that look beyond those headlines to celebrate the difficult, messy, delightful juggling act of parenthood. She shares three of her favorites.
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Apr 9, 2013 — Six teens at a summer arts camp dub themselves, only somewhat ironically, "the Interestings" in Meg Wolitzer's novel of the same name. As the book follows the friends into love, marriage and adulthood, some realize their artistic ambitions while others adjust to less interesting lives.
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Apr 3, 2013 — Six talented friends meet as teenagers one summer at a camp called Spirit-in-the-Woods. Meg Wolitzer's new novel follows their friendship over the next 40 years, from the success and failure of their artistic dreams to the envy that grows from the difference.
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Mar 26, 2013 — Read an exclusive excerpt of Meg Wolitzer's new book, The Interestings. It's the story of a group of bright, talented kids who bond at summer camp in the 1970s — dubbing themselves the Interestings — and what happens to friendship and early promise as the years roll along.
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Mar 14, 2012 — Novelists Patricia Marx and Meg Wolitzer take a fresh look at romance, while Samuel Park explores how its fallout leads to an unlikely immigration trajectory for his Korean heroine. In nonfiction, James Gleick explores information theory, Antonio Damasio rethinks consciousness, and Joshua Foer investigates the nature of memory.
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Aug 17, 2011 — For those readers looking to exercise their brains while lounging by the pool, this summer has some great reading options. These five engaging books are witty, smart and, best of all, a lot of fun.
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Apr 6, 2011 — In this novel, women in one town suddenly lose their libido after a drama teacher at the high school starts staging Lysistrata. Nobody talks about the sudden decrease in drive in this off-kilter thought experiment, where desire and love retreat into listlessness with mysterious force.
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