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July 29, 2014 | NPR · House and Senate negotiators reached a compromise, $17 billion agreement to improve medical care for veterans. The deal comes in the final week before Congress leaves town for a monthlong recess.
 
July 29, 2014 | NPR · Washington Post reporter Liz Sly tells Renee Montagne that U.S. arms may be flowing to moderate Syrian rebels, but the aid seems to be too little too late to affect the course of the civil war.
 
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July 28, 2014 | NPR · The militant group threatens to kill parents who immunize their children. As a result, polio has come roaring back in Pakistan. Eradication now hinges on whether the country can control the virus.
 

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July 28, 2014 | NPR · A new salvo has been fired in the fight over teacher tenure. A group led by former TV anchor Campbell Brown filed a complaint in New York state court, arguing that tenure laws are preventing the state from providing every child with the "sound, basic education" its constitution guarantees.
 
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July 28, 2014 | NPR · Why are so many low-income and minority kids getting second-class educations in the U.S.? That question is at the center of the heated debate about tenure protections and who gets them.
 
July 28, 2014 | NPR · Only one movie in July, Transformers: Age of Extinction, has broken the 100 million mark during its opening weekend. Box office receipts all summer have proven anemic. Paul Dergarabedian, a senior media analyst with RENTRAK, talks to Audie Cornish about the box office slump.
 

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July 26, 2014 | NPR · Hezbollah has been a longtime ally of Hamas, but during this most recent conflict between Israel and Gaza they've taken a sideline role. NPR's Scott Simon talks to the BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut.
 

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September 5, 2011 | NPR · Weekend Edition Sunday premiered on Jan. 18, 1987. Since then, Weekend Edition Sunday has covered newsmakers and artists, scientists and politicans, music makers of all kinds, writers, thinkers, theologians and all manner of news events. Originally hosted by Susan Stamberg, the show was anchored by Liane Hansen for 22 years.
 

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Hungary

Jul 24, 2011 — Like a good summer read, a trip to the Rocky Mountains provides an elevated get-away from the daily grind. Nicole Magistro, owner of The Bookworm in Edwards, Colo., names some of the more popular reads for Vail Valley vacationers this summer.
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Jul 14, 2011 — NPR coverage of Fiasco by Imre Kertesz and Tim Wilkinson. News, author interviews, critics' picks and more.
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Apr 7, 2011 — Imre Kertesz was awarded the Nobel Prize for his writing in 2002, when he was relatively unknown and few titles were available in English. The Hungarian writer's Fiasco has just been translated, telling the story of the absurdly oppressive measures of a Stalinist government.
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Feb 16, 2011 — Translated from German, Johanna Adorjan's An Exclusive Love reconstructs the day of her grandparents' joint suicide. Adorjan wonders what led the two Holocaust survivors to take their own lives together after years of marriage.
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Jan 26, 2011 — Julie Orringer's much-anticipated first novel is a love story set on the eve of World War II, while Anne Tyler's latest probes a man's personal awakening at age 60. Meanwhile, David Malouf re-imagines one of Homer's most famous encounters. In nonfiction, Dr. Louann Brizendine is back with a look at the male brain.
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Dec 10, 2010 — It's that time of year again! Susan Stamberg chats with three independent booksellers about their favorite reads of the year, from an atlas of remote islands to a children's book about feminist heroes.
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May 4, 2010 — Julie Orringer's The Invisible Bridge follows a Hungarian couple enjoying a Parisian romance when the Nazi rise to power forces them back to their homeland. Reviewer Michael Schaub says that Orringer, who wrote the short story collection How to Breathe Underwater, has written a first novel that is unexpected but breathtaking.
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Oct 24, 2006 — In his book Failed Illusions, scholar Charles Gati offers a new assessment of the Hungarian anticommunist uprising of 1956, arguing that the failures were widespread, and the "gap between words and deeds was huge" in the U.S. response.
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