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September 2, 2014 | NPR · At a Labor Day picnic in Milwaukee, the president accused the GOP of blocking economic initiatives. He urged the sympathetic union audience to turn their frustration into political action in November.
 
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September 2, 2014 | NPR · The city's plan to restructure its debt has been praised as a creative way to protect both pensioners and its art museum. But some creditors — and residents — feel like they're being railroaded.
 
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September 2, 2014 | NPR · A company called WTAS is reviving the defunct accounting firm's name and hoping clients have forgotten its associations with the Enron scandal.
 

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September 1, 2014 | NPR · Ebola has exposed weaknesses in Africa's health networks and a failure to work together to arrest the spread of the virus. The "not our problem" response is taking an economic toll on the continent.
 
September 1, 2014 | NPR · Nearly 260 health workers in West Africa have been infected, and 134 have died. Dr. Robert Garry of Tulane University, who worked with five who died, discusses the devastation in the community.
 
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September 1, 2014 | NPR · Ads with candidates shooting guns are proliferating this year. It can all be traced back to Sen. Joe Manchin's famed 2010 spot "Dead Aim."
 

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August 30, 2014 | NPR · Ukrainian forces are defending the port city of Novoazovsk from what they say is a Russian invasion. Scott Simon talks to correspondent Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson.
 

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August 31, 2014 | NPR · Immigration remains one of the most challenging issues for President Obama. Political correspondent Mara Liasson discusses the political cost of the choices before him with Linda Wertheimer.
 

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Social change

Dec 10, 2013 — Whatever happened on Easter Island, it wasn't good. Polynesians landed there, farmed, thrived, built their famous statues, and then things went very bad, very fast. Sixteen million trees vanished. What happened? Was this a case of ecological collapse? Not exactly, say two anthropologists. It was, arguably, worse than that.
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Nov 22, 2013 — In The World Until Yesterday, at No. 8, Jared Diamond hails the wisdom of traditional societies.
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Oct 28, 2013 — In softcover fiction, Tracy Chevalier follows an English Quaker across the Atlantic, Herman Koch serves a meal with a hefty helping of unease and Peter Sis brings an ancient flock of birds into the 21st century. In nonfiction, Jared Diamond mines lessons from traditional societies.
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Feb 8, 2013 — Al Gore's The Future describes the six forces that are shaping our world. It debuts at No. 5.
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Jan 17, 2013 — In his new book, Jared Diamond explores how hunters and gatherers, herders and farmers live in small-scale societies — and urges the rest of us to learn from their practices. Commentator Barbara J. King ponders why the book is making her tribe — anthropologists — so mad.
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Jan 11, 2013 — Jared Diamond's The World Until Yesterday finds lessons in earlier cultures. It debuts at No. 2.
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Jan 10, 2013 — In his new book, Jared Diamond describes how readily people in small-scale societies learn to speak many distinct languages. After reading Diamond's book, commentator Barbara J. King takes time to consider what we in the U.S. may lose in a sea of monolingualism.
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Aug 16, 2012 — In fiction, novelists Sebastian Rotella and Tahmima Anam explore cultural frictions along South America's "triple border" and in Bangladesh, respectively. In nonfiction, Jermaine Jackson remembers his brother Michael, and Charles King explores the history of Odessa, Ukraine.
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Aug 1, 2012 — In Ways of Forgetting, Ways of Remembering: Japan in the Modern World, historian John Dower examines how culture and propaganda have shaped politics in the U.S. and Japan. He also explores the idea that how and what we remember can affect how we view history and the present.
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Apr 22, 2012 — When Akash Kapur returned to India after more than a decade of living in the United States, he returned to a place he hardly recognized. He chronicles some of those changes in his book, India Becoming: A Portrait of Life in Modern India.
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