Latest News from NPR

on:

NCPR is supported by:

 
Hourly Newscast
4 min., 45 sec.

Programs

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Latest Features:
April 18, 2014 | NPR · The agreement calls on all parties to refrain from violence, requires that illegally-armed groups disarm and that control of government buildings be returned to Ukrainian authorities.
 
April 18, 2014 | NPR · President Obama said enrollment under the Affordable Care Act reached 8 million after the deadline was extended by 2 weeks. The figure represents a turnaround from the disastrous debut of the website.
 
April 18, 2014 | NPR · Morning Edition recently spent a lot of time reporting on the U.S.-Mexico border. President Obama has deported 2 million people from the U.S. With so many deportations, it's hard to tell if that number is accurate.
 

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Latest Features:
April 17, 2014 | NPR · President Obama met Thursday with insurance company executives and a separate group of insurance regulators from the states, discussing their mutual interest in administering the new health care law.
 
Getty Images
April 17, 2014 | NPR · The president has visited Prince George's County, Md., four times this year. It is the most affluent county with an African-American majority. It also happens to be very close to the White House.
 
NASA/SETI Institute/JPL-Caltech
April 17, 2014 | NPR · Kepler-186f is almost the same size as Earth, and it orbits in its star's "Goldilocks zone"-- where temperatures may be just right for life. But much is unknown because it's also 500 light-years away.
 

Latest Saturday rundown




WE Saturday Feature

AP
April 12, 2014 | NPR · As pro-Russia demonstrators continue their tense standoff in Eastern Ukraine, police are conspicuously absent from city streets.
 

Latest Sunday rundown


WE Sunday Feature

April 13, 2014 | NPR · As the anniversary of last year's marathon bombing approaches, NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with correspondent Carrie Johnson about the investigation and legal wrangling yet to come.
 

Latest program rundown

Coming up:

Social change

Dec 10, 2013 — Whatever happened on Easter Island, it wasn't good. Polynesians landed there, farmed, thrived, built their famous statues, and then things went very bad, very fast. Sixteen million trees vanished. What happened? Was this a case of ecological collapse? Not exactly, say two anthropologists. It was, arguably, worse than that.
Comments |
Nov 22, 2013 — In The World Until Yesterday, at No. 8, Jared Diamond hails the wisdom of traditional societies.
Comments |
Oct 28, 2013 — In softcover fiction, Tracy Chevalier follows an English Quaker across the Atlantic, Herman Koch serves a meal with a hefty helping of unease and Peter Sis brings an ancient flock of birds into the 21st century. In nonfiction, Jared Diamond mines lessons from traditional societies.
Comments |
Feb 8, 2013 — Al Gore's The Future describes the six forces that are shaping our world. It debuts at No. 5.
Comments |
Jan 17, 2013 — In his new book, Jared Diamond explores how hunters and gatherers, herders and farmers live in small-scale societies — and urges the rest of us to learn from their practices. Commentator Barbara J. King ponders why the book is making her tribe — anthropologists — so mad.
Comments |
Jan 11, 2013 — Jared Diamond's The World Until Yesterday finds lessons in earlier cultures. It debuts at No. 2.
Comments |
Jan 10, 2013 — In his new book, Jared Diamond describes how readily people in small-scale societies learn to speak many distinct languages. After reading Diamond's book, commentator Barbara J. King takes time to consider what we in the U.S. may lose in a sea of monolingualism.
Comments |
Aug 16, 2012 — In fiction, novelists Sebastian Rotella and Tahmima Anam explore cultural frictions along South America's "triple border" and in Bangladesh, respectively. In nonfiction, Jermaine Jackson remembers his brother Michael, and Charles King explores the history of Odessa, Ukraine.
Comments |
Aug 1, 2012 — In Ways of Forgetting, Ways of Remembering: Japan in the Modern World, historian John Dower examines how culture and propaganda have shaped politics in the U.S. and Japan. He also explores the idea that how and what we remember can affect how we view history and the present.
Launch in player | Comments |
Apr 22, 2012 — When Akash Kapur returned to India after more than a decade of living in the United States, he returned to a place he hardly recognized. He chronicles some of those changes in his book, India Becoming: A Portrait of Life in Modern India.
Launch in player | Comments |
more Social change from NPR