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July 30, 2014 | KQED · Adding a translation to the English label would require bigger bottles, pharmacists say. They worry patients would wind up carrying a few pills around loose — without any instructions at all.
 
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July 30, 2014 | WNYC · In the past 20 years, New Jersey went from having more than 20 percent of U.S. pharmaceutical manufacturing jobs to less than 10 percent. That means offices, labs and warehouses have gone dark.
 
July 30, 2014 | NPR · Sheik Humarr Khan, one of the doctors fighting to control West Africa's largest Ebola outbreak, died Tuesday in Sierra Leone. He was 39.
 

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July 30, 2014 | NPR · An explosion rocked a crowded Gaza market during what was expected to be a lull in the fighting. Earlier in the day a United Nations school was hit by what U.N. officials say was Israeli artillery fire, killing at least 15 people. Meanwhile, rocket fire from Gaza continues to be fired into Israel.
 
July 30, 2014 | NPR · Federal Reserve policymakers are announcing that the Fed plans to leave short-term interest rates at a level near zero. This, despite an economy that grew at a surprisingly strong 4 percent annual rate in the most recent quarter.
 
July 30, 2014 | NPR · Wildfires are ravaging thousands of square miles on the West Coast, though officials say that this wildfire season has been tamer than average. Still, responding to these fires has proven costly, and the Obama administration is reevaluating how it pays for fighting them.
 

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July 26, 2014 | NPR · Hezbollah has been a longtime ally of Hamas, but during this most recent conflict between Israel and Gaza they've taken a sideline role. NPR's Scott Simon talks to the BBC's Kim Ghattas in Beirut.
 

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July 27, 2014 | NPR · Fighting in Ukraine near the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 has international investigators staying away. NPR's Arun Rath talks with OSCE's Michael Bociurkiw about the investigation.
 

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Armed Forces

May 14, 2013 — In 2011, Jessica Buchanan, an aid worker in Somalia, was kidnapped by land pirates. For 93 days she fought off despair while her husband, Erik Landemalm, wondered if he'd ever see her again. In a two-part interview, Buchanan and Landemalm recall Buchanan's capture and her dramatic rescue by Navy SEALs.
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May 13, 2013 — David Greene speaks with Jessica Buchanan and her husband Erik Landemalm about their book Impossible Odds. It's the story of Jessica's abduction, along with a fellow aid worker, by Somali pirates in 2011. In the first of the two-part interview, we hear how Jessica was abducted, and how she refused to fall into despair while in captivity.
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Mar 15, 2013 — At No. 3, Rachel Maddow's Drift argues that military bloat has led to a state of near-perpetual war.
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Mar 4, 2013 — In fiction, Nathan Englander's short stories, Amanda Coplin's Pacific Northwest drama and Anthony Giardina's tale of miscalculated suburban escape arrive in paperback. In softcover nonfiction, Rachel Maddow takes stock of America's perpetual wars and Lauren F. Winner reflects on her crisis of faith.
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Jan 10, 2013 — In his new book, The Double V, Rawn James Jr. argues that to understand race in America one must understand the history of African-Americans in the military. While the turning point came between the world wars, the struggle began with the American Revolution.
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May 7, 2012 — In her new book, MSNBC anchor Rachel Maddow invokes Thomas Jefferson to argue for limited government — at least in the case of the military. She argues that sometimes we got to war because we've invested so much in military strength.
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Apr 11, 2012 — Novelist Mary Gordon looks at love and maturity, while Henning Mankell delivers his last Kurt Wallander mystery. In nonfiction, Jim Rasenberger revisits the Bay of Pigs, Gayle Tzemach Lemmon tells of Afghani women's ingenuity, Charles Ogletree probes the arrest of Henry Louis Gates Jr., and Meagan O'Rourke meditates on her mother's death.
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Apr 5, 2012Rachel Maddow explores the state of American national security in Drift, which debuts at No. 1.
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Mar 27, 2012 — The popular MSNBC host talks about her start in broadcasting, her life and her new book Drift: The Unmooring of American Military Power, in which she argues that America's national defense has become disconnected from public oversight.
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Feb 29, 2012 — Former Los Angeles prosecutor Marcia Clark debuts as a mystery writer, and Julian Barnes returns with stories of love. Robert Putnam and David Campbell look at American religion, Ron Rosenbaum warns of the potential for nuclear war, and Bing West evaluates military failures in Afghanistan.
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