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April 18, 2014 | NPR · The agreement calls on all parties to refrain from violence, requires that illegally-armed groups disarm and that control of government buildings be returned to Ukrainian authorities.
 
April 18, 2014 | NPR · President Obama said enrollment under the Affordable Care Act reached 8 million after the deadline was extended by 2 weeks. The figure represents a turnaround from the disastrous debut of the website.
 
April 18, 2014 | NPR · Morning Edition spent a lot of time recently reporting from the U.S.-Mexico border. President Obama has deported 2 million people from the U.S. But many say that number is misleading.
 

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April 18, 2014 | NPR · It looks as though the "comment period" for the controversial Keystone XL pipeline project will be extended, delaying a decision past the November elections.
 
April 18, 2014 | NPR · Regular political commentators, E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and David Brooks of The New York Times, discuss the breakthrough Ukraine deal and the new health care enrollment numbers.
 
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April 18, 2014 | NPR · Ivan Soltesz studies epilepsy in mice, but says children with chronic seizures are his inspiration. He's closing in on a way to quell the seizures with light — and without drugs' side effects.
 

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April 19, 2014 | NPR · The search continues for hundreds of people, mostly students, who were on board a South Korean ferry when it sank this week. Correspondent Anthony Kuhn shares the latest with NPR's Wade Goodwyn.
 

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April 13, 2014 | NPR · As the anniversary of last year's marathon bombing approaches, NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with correspondent Carrie Johnson about the investigation and legal wrangling yet to come.
 

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Stephen L. Carter

Apr 8, 2013 — In fiction, Stephen L. Carter's reimagining of Lincoln's presidency and Joshua Henkin's tale of a family's fragmented mourning arrive in paperback. In softcover nonfiction, Bill Clegg recounts his attempt to stay clean, and Tim Kreider lifts the curtain on the human condition.
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Jul 7, 2012 — Did Abraham Lincoln subvert the Constitution? That's the startling premise of a new novel from Yale Law School professor Stephen Carter, in which Lincoln survives that terrible night at Ford's Theatre, only to face an impeachment trial two years later.
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May 24, 2012 — Critic Michael Schaub offers a sneak peek at some of the most hotly anticipated books of the summer: An Obama bio. A sparkling debut. Thrillers of both the fictional and body-science kind. Even Lincoln is reborn in this season of sun, sand, renewal — and reading.
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Sep 8, 2011 — Over the past few weeks, Talk of the Nation has been asking for the books you think should be required reading for all college freshmen. Here are 10 of your suggestions.
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Mar 23, 2011 — The Obama administration insists the military intervention in Libya is a humanitarian effort to protect civilians. But if the real mission proves to be regime change, that may change the equation. Stephen Carter, author of The Violence of Peace, explains the criteria for a "just war."
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Jan 24, 2011 — President Obama may have campaigned as a peace candidate, but in the book The Violence of Peace, author Stephen Carter argues that Obama has largely accepted former President George W. Bush's war policies — and in some cases expanded them.
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Jul 29, 2009 — What makes a great beach read? The producer of our book series, Ellen Silva, thinks it's a book set where you're vacationing. She has picked four spots — Venice Beach, Calif.; Cape Cod and Martha's Vineyard in Massachusetts; and South Beach in Florida — with great surf and even better books.
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Jul 21, 2009 — Stephen Carter has a new thriller called Jericho's Fall. Linda Wertheimer talks to him about the basis for his tale of spies, official secrecy and financial fraud. The story centers on a former director of the Central Intelligence Agency and his leverage against the other players in his shadowy world. This is Carter's fourth novel but his first spy thriller.
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Sep 15, 2008 — Yale law professor Stephen Carter sets his novels in the world of wealthy and well-educated black Americans. His third novel, Palace Council, is both historical and contemporary. Carter chronicles the pivotal struggles over race and politics in the 1960s.
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Aug 7, 2007 — Carter's sprawling, old-fashioned whodunit unravels the murder of a noted Ivy League economist. The book's heroes are an accomplished and well-connected black American couple whose fictional family saga offers a window into a rarely seen part of our culture.
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